Storage Deployment and Implementation
August 2-3, 2017
Westchester, NY

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Overview

While solar has been hot in terms of deal flow, investment and deployment in recent years, the energy storage industry is undergoing its own revolution and emergence into the main stream. Energy storage is a crucial tool for enabling the effective integration of renewable energy and unlocking the benefits of local generation and a clean, resilient energy supply. The technology is now proving its value to grid operators around the world who must manage the variable generation of solar and wind energy.

In many parts of the U.S., states are working to advance the technology through procurement mandates, pilot programs, and market design changes aimed at recognizing the services that can be provided by a range of energy storage applications. The Northeast states in particular, are pursuing market and regulatory changes to integrate more storage.  As this and other regions plan for a system that is more dependent on variable renewable resources, energy storage will play an important role in providing cost-effective and reliable electricity.

This symposium will provide an overview of the regulatory landscape, distributed generation , load profiles, the economic justification of storage, challenges of interconnection, non-wire alternatives, mobile storage and lessons learned. The symposium materials provide valuable information on a full spectrum of applications for utilities, regulatory agencies, project developers, private investors, finance firms, wholesale market participants, and owners of existing wind and solar power plants.

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss the latest development and trends in energy storage
  • Discuss the current regulatory landscape for battery technologies
  • Explain the storage battery interconnection process
  • Evaluate the economic justification for storage
  • Identify the current and future roles for storage with customer load profiles
  • Explain emerging role of storage batteries
  • Discuss the growth and mechanics of distributed energy storage markets

Credits

AP_Logo

EUCI has been accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).  In obtaining this accreditation, EUCI has demonstrated that it  complies with the ANSI/IACET Standard which is recognized internationally as a standard of good practice. As a result of their Authorized Provider status, EUCI is authorized to offer IACET CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET Standard.

EUCI is authorized by IACET to offer 1.0 CEUs for this symposium and 0.3 CEUs for the workshop.

 

Requirements for Successful Completion of Program

Participants must sign in/out each day and be in attendance for the entirety of the course to be eligible for continuing education credit.

Instructional Methods

This program will include PowerPoint presentations and panel discussions

Agenda

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

12:30 – 1:00 p.m. :: Registration

1:00– 5:30 p.m. :: Symposium Timing


Session I: Policy/Regulatory/Legal Landscape

On the regulatory side, the storage industry has gained strong momentum recently from FERC dockets that have the potential to improve the market. This session will define policy/regulatory landscape for battery technologies, policy issues, regulatory challenges, interconnection/control standards and functionality, industry/utility standards for discharge, response time, etc.

  • Federal/State
  • Interconnection rules/standards
  • DERMS platform
  • Northeastand other regional regulatory storage perspectives—status and trends

Paul Hibbard, Vice President, Analysis Group (Former Chair, Massachusetts Dept. Public Utilities)

Andrew Kaplan, Partner, Pierce Atwood LLP

David South, Senior Principal Energy & Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners

3:15 – 3:30 p.m. :: Networking Break


Session II: Distributed Energy Storage

The relationship between utilities and their C&I customers is rapidly changing: C&I enterprises are becoming electricity producers as well as consumers, and profit from actively managing the shape and timing of their energy use. Distributed energy storage is empowering next-generation energy storage-based services on both sides of the electricity meter: reducing energy costs and increasing resiliency for C&I enterprises, while improving efficiency, predictability, and dispatch-ability of distributed assets for utilities that serve them.

This session will provide a landscape of current market and use cases, storage types, experiences, market players and the state of technology

  • Market and use cases
  • Technologies available for local storage
  • The benefits that local storage can provide
  • Market, rate and tariff challenges to monetizing the benefits of storage, and potential solutions

Jim McClanahan, Senior Principal Energy and Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners

Paul A. DeCotis, Senior Director Energy & Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners

5:30 p.m. :: Networking Reception


Thursday, August 3, 2017

7:45 – 8:15 a.m. :: Continental Breakfast

8:15 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. :: Symposium Timing

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. :: Group Luncheon


Session III: Energy Storage: Role in the Market, Competing Resources

Energy storage deployments in the northeast and emerging markets worldwide are expected to grow substantially in the coming decade. This session will define the current and future roles for storage and how the customer load profile drives strategic calculations and tactical decisions

  • Role of Storage (Generation v. Load Modifier)
  • Alternative Services (VAR, FR)
  • Competitive Alternatives
    • Local/behind the substation solutions
    • Non-Wire alternatives (DER, EE, DR)
    • Electric vehicle storage
    • Mobile storage
    • Other types of storage

Mike Jacobs, Electricity Markets Lead, Union of Concerned Scientists

Bob Foxen, Owner, Global Common

Shelly Hagerman, Experienced Consultant Energy & Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners


Session IV: Economics/Value Proposition

The value proposition of energy storage changes significantly depending on where it is deployed on the electricity grid. This session will examine the current and future landscape for different applications, the value stack, economic justification, current/emerging market functions and an illustrative business case.

  • Markets/Roles
  • Stand-alone (feeders, substations, etc).
  • Solar + Storage (new, retrofit)
  • Arbitrage opportunities, aggregators
  • Business case

Steven Casey, Manager Strategic Planning, Eversource Energy

Joyce McLaren, Senior Research Analyst, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Matthew Stedl, Development Director, Tradewind Energy

David South, Senior Principal Energy & Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners


Session V: Vendor Panel:

As the demand for storage to support the distribution grid expands, available storage solutions emerge. In this segment, vendors take on inquiries as to how their storage solutions have become more easily scalable and how they can be deployed.

Kevin Fok, Senior Project Manager, LG Chem

Andy Marshal, Senior Product Manager, Landis+Gyr

Philip Fischer, Sales Director, NEC Energy Solutions, Inc.


Session VI: Grid Connected Storage: Operations

Interconnection standards dictate the technical, legal, and procedural requirements that customers, project developers and utilities must follow for interconnecting new generation to the electric grid. This session will provide an introduction to important aspects of general interconnection standards and requirements specifically applicable to energy storage projects.

  • History and background of interconnection to the grid
  • Benefits of grid-connected battery storage and grid applications
  • Challenges of grid-connected battery storage
  • Optimizing grid-connected battery storage to enhance renewable energy performance
  • Improving the processes for energy storage interconnection

Jim McClanahan, Senior Principal Energy and Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners

Chuck Hermann, Senior Engineer, New York Power Authority

George Crabtree, Director, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (invited)


Session VII: Lessons Learned Panel

As storage pilot projects and larger implementations have now come on board and have interconnected to the grid, this Panel will discuss the successes and pitfalls of their projects providing education for developers and PPA buyers so they can accomplish future projects in a faster, more efficient manner allowing for reduced costs and improved results.

Panel Discussion


Session VIII: Open Q&A Session and Wrap Up

The symposium chairs will provide a recap of the key points that were covered during the event. This closing session will also allow conference attendees to ask questions about the storage presentations and any issues, ideas or problems that come to mind.

4:30 p.m. :: Symposium Adjourns

Workshop

Battery Technology Fundamentals

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. :: Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:30 – 11:30 a.m. :: Workshop Timing

Overview

As North America moves increasingly towards more renewable energy sources and away from fossil fuels, new technologies must emerge to capture energy production as well as provide new ways to store and deliver power. An ongoing issue with solar and wind production is the inability to predict exactly when its production will occur and when the consequent power can be dispatched.   One of the technological responses that provides at least a partial answer to this dilemma is battery energy storage systems, whose integration into the electricity grid have become increasingly important as they can help support multiple grid services.

In this workshop, attendees will hear from industry experts about the current state of battery technology, developers/manufacturers/BOP, scale/application challenges and research, development & demonstration.

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss current status of battery storage technologies such as Lithium ion, deep cycle, and lead acid batteries, and state-of-the-art battery materials and chemistries
  • Discuss the effectiveness the battery storage technologies that have been deployed
  • Evaluate current battery technology supporting energy storage programs
  • Discuss how future technologies will improve and advance storage

Agenda

  • Battery Types and Chemistry
  • Market Players
  • Critical Factors
  • Breakthrough Expectations
  • Role of Storage Batteries in Future Power Grids
  • Storage Battery Market Segments
  • Conclusions

Instructor

Shelly Hagerman, Consultant – Energy & Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners

In her role, Ms. Hagerman helps clients understand complex problems using advanced modeling capabilities to build solid business case analysis. Prior to West Monroe, Shelly received a PhD from Carnegie Mellon University in Engineering & Public Policy. Her thesis focused on the economics of behind-the-meter solar photovoltaics and energy storage. Since joining West Monroe, Shelly has been a lead developer for a project to examine how various rate structures and policies affect solar photovoltaics and energy storage economics.

Speakers

George Crabtree, Director, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (invited)

Paul A. DeCotis, Senior Director Energy & Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners

Kevin Fok, Senior Project Manager, LG Chem

Bob Foxen, Owner, Global Common

Shelly Hagerman, Experienced Consultant Energy & Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners

Paul Hibbard, Vice President, Analysis Group (Former Chair, Massachusetts Dept. Public Utilities)

Mike Jacobs, Electricity Markets Lead, Union of Concerned Scientists

Andrew Kaplan, Partner, Pierce Atwood LLP

Roger Lin Senior Director, Product Marketing NEC Energy Solutions, Inc.

Andy Marshal, Senior Product Manager, Landis+Gyr

Jim McClanahan, Senior Principal Energy and Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners

Joyce McLaren, Senior Research Analyst, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

David South, Senior Principal Energy & Utilities Practice, West Monroe Partners

Matthew Stedl, Development Director, Tradewind Energy

Location

Westchester Marriott
670 White Plains Road
Tarrytown, NY 10591

To reserve your room, please call 1-914-631-2200
Please indicate that you are with the EUCI group to receive the group rate.

You can book online using this link

 http://www.marriott.com/meeting-event-hotels/group-corporate-travel/groupCorp.mi?resLinkData=EUCI%20Meeting%20White%20Plains%5Enycwe%60EMGEMGA%7CEMGEMGD%60165.00%60USD%60false%604%608/1/17%608/4/17%607/3/17&app=resvlink&stop_mobi=yes

Room Rate:

The room rate is $165.00 single or double plus applicable taxes.

Room Block Dates:

A room block has been reserved for the nights of August 1 – 3, 2017.

Rate Available Until:

Make your reservations prior to July 10, 2017. There are a limited number of rooms available at the conference rate. Please make your reservations early.

Register

Please Note: Confirmed speakers do not need to register and are encouraged to participate in all sessions of the event. If you are a speaker and have any questions please contact our offices at 1.303.770.8800

Event Standard RateAttendees
Storage Deployment and ImplementationUS $ 1395.00

This event has the following workshops:

Battery Technology FundamentalsUS $ 595.00

*Please note: all attendees of the conference will receive a flash drive containing all presentations that are made available by the presenters. If you cannot attend the conference but would still like a copy of these materials, please consider purchasing the proceedings package listed below

I cannot attend but would like a copy of the proceedings

Proceedings package US $ 395.00

Take advantage of these discounts!

  • Attend the Conference and workshop and pay $1,795.00 per attendee (save $ 195.00 each)

Register 3 Send 4th Free!

Any organization wishing to send multiple attendees to these conferences may send 1 FREE for every 3 delegates registered. Please note that all registrations must be made at the same time to qualify.

Cancellation Policy

Your registration may be transferred to a member of your organization up to 24 hours in advance of the event. Cancellations must be received on or before June 30, 2017 in order to be refunded and will be subject to a US $195.00 processing fee per registrant. No refunds will be made after this date. Cancellations received after this date will create a credit of the tuition (less processing fee) good toward any other EUCI event. This credit will be good for six months from the cancellation date. In the event of non-attendance, all registration fees will be forfeited. In case of conference cancellation, EUCIs liability is limited to refund of the event registration fee only. For more information regarding administrative policies, such as complaints and refunds, please contact our offices at 303-770-8800

Sponsors
Landis + Gyr    
Supporting Organization