Reciprocating Engines for Operational Reliability and Resilience

Reciprocating Engines for Operational Reliability and Resilience

November 30, 2022 | Online :: Central Time

“Excellent information! Very good presentations. If you want to learn more about RICE, this is a great way to do it.” General Manager, GEUS

The power industry faces many challenges as it transitions to a new operational paradigm. Utilities and legislators are implementing large amounts of renewable energy as decarbonization targets are being set across the world, but challenges arise due to the intermittence of renewable energy supplies. Meanwhile, increasingly severe weather events, disasters, and wildfires are triggering greater numbers of costly power outages. Flexible generating capacity and redundant backup power systems are increasingly seen as a necessity for resilience against grid outages and to maintain system reliability.

This symposium examines the role that reciprocating engines and backup generation systems can play in balancing the needs of changing backup power systems for efficiency, reliability, and operational flexibility without undermining efforts to reduce carbon emissions. Industry experts will examine the benefits, costs, and technologies involved in developing reciprocating engine facilities and right-sizing them to serve utility capacity needs, as well as their role in a variety of configurations, from backup generation paired with storage to microgrid and black-start applications. Key insights into fuel choices, balancing renewables, and O&M will be shared. Register now for a better understanding of the role reciprocating engines can play in delivering efficiency, flexibility, reliability, and resilience to energy systems.

Learning Outcomes

This course will provide attendees an opportunity to:

  • Discuss the role reciprocating engines can play in supporting the transition to renewable generation
  • Assess the benefits of reciprocating generators for low-emission and reliable backup power
  • Evaluate best fit technologies
  • Review the economics of project development
  • Identify key concerns in developing utility black start capabilities
  • Analyze resource planning with reciprocating engines
  • Examine the changing industry landscape for reciprocating engines
  • Discuss lessons learned from engine plant development
  • Assess advancements in engine technology that increase operational flexibility
  • Appraise the benefits of microgrids and islanding
  • Review hydrogen blending pilot projects for power generation facilities
  • Assess the value of reciprocating engines in today’s energy market

Agenda

Wednesday, November 30, 2022 : Central Time

8:45 – 9:00 a.m.
Log In and Welcome

12:15 – 1:00 p.m.
Lunch Break

9:00 a.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Course Timing

 

9:00 – 9:45 a.m. :: Reciprocating Engines: The Right-Sized Resource

As renewable integration increases on the grid, operators are challenged to provide the flexible generation needed to accommodate significant up or down system load ramps and maintain system balance. Many ISOs are creating ancillary service markets that reward flexible generation. As a result, power producers are turning to reciprocating engine power plants to supplement renewable generation. This presentation will discuss market trends, current technology and development considerations for reciprocating engine power plants designed to firm renewables.

Tim Carey, RICE Business Unit Manager, Burns and McDonnell

9:45 – 10:30 a.m. :: Scaling Backup Generation: Evaluating Best Fit Technologies for Operational Needs

Power system modeling is not a new concept, but the system dynamics have been changing significantly over the last 5–10 years in systems where intermittent renewable resources have been added at a fast pace, and at a large scale.  These intermittent resources create a need to model power systems in smaller time increments to really see the impacts and generation resource mixes required to provide a resilient and reliable system.  Additionally, with the correct data inputs these same power system models can provide least cost of electricity (LCOE) estimates over entire systems that can adapt and provide various results based on multiple scenarios and hypothetical disruption events. Wärtsilä uses PLEXOS software to model power systems and has done modeling for hundreds of systems around the world.  In an unbiased manner, these models tell the story of the Path to Net Zero and show, system by system, what the optimal path looks like.

Jon Rodriguez, Engine Business Director, Wärtsilä Energy

10:30 – 10:45 a.m. :: Morning Break

10:45  – 11:30 a.m. :: Power Industry Perspective on Reciprocating Engines

Reciprocating internal combustion engines (RICE) can produce peaking power, support grid reliability, provide other services including black start and resiliency, and in some cases even generate baseload power. Their wide range of use cases adds to operational and fuel flexibility, fast startup and ramping times, high efficiency at a wide range of loads, low water use, and competitive costs as potential benefits of RICE. This presentation will examine the power industry’s experience with RICE providing utility-scale power to date, and the changing landscape being driven by the push towards low-carbon power and its impacts on the future of RICE for power generation.

Dr. Andy Maxson, Program Manager, EPRI

11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. :: Microgrids and the Benefits of Islanding

Remotely situated generating stations can offer additional benefits beyond contributing to a state’s overall generating capacity. When configured to allow for separation from the larger grid and to be energized exclusively from the plant when transmission sources are curtailed, reciprocating engine plants can function as a microgrid in “island” mode, offsetting the community impact of power outages resulting from strains elsewhere in the grid. This session will examine the strategy behind developing reciprocating plant microgrids with islanding capabilities to protect the economic and safety interests of the communities they service.

Allan Schurr, Chief Commercial Officer, Enchanted Rock Solutions

12:15 – 1:00 p.m. :: Lunch Break

1:00 – 1:45 p.m. :: The Role for Reciprocating Engines in the U.S. Energy Market Transition

With the Inflation Reduction Act being passed into law this past August, the U.S. aims to aggressively reduce carbon emissions roughly 40% by 2030 in investing into clean energy infrastructure.  With the energy landscape changing so rapidly, the need for clean long-term energy storage has never been so important.  In collaboration with ammonia suppliers, MAN Energy Solutions will present the value proposition of a MAN reciprocating engine power plant burning natural gas and green ammonia (as a storage component) in comparison to other long duration energy storage vehicles.

Brian Fladger, Senior Manager Energy Consulting and Commercial Analytics, MAN Energy Solutions

Alex Gorosito, Regional Sales Manager, Power Solutions, MAN Energy Solutions

Michael Fiedler, Business Development Manager, Power Solutions, MAN Energy Solutions

1:45 – 2:30 p.m. :: Black Start Capable: Developing a Utility Emergency Backup Strategy

A black start unit is one that can start its own power without support from the grid in the event of a major system collapse or a system-wide blackout. Every region in the United States has its own black start plan with designated black start unit that typically include a battery support system, an ignition source, and a diesel generator. This presentation will examine black start capabilities and strategies, and the crucial role of reciprocating engines in restoring power to an impacted system.

George Ransom, Business Development Manager, Burns and McDonnell

Todd Halling, Program Manager, Burns and McDonnell

2:30 – 2:45 p.m. :: Afternoon Break

2:45 – 3:45 p.m. :: Pathways to Successful Reciprocating Engine Project Development

Developing a reciprocating plant merits careful attention, as project choices can significantly influence cost and flexibility. What are the best practices to follow in bringing a recip project online? This presentation will examine the processes and considerations involved in reciprocating project development and implementation, including planning and conceptual design, feasibility studies, permitting, design and engineering, decisions regarding fuel supply sources, site evaluations, grid interconnection and transmission, construction and commissioning. This session will also include a virtual tour of Bancroft Generation’s 20 MW peaking plant, designed to provide electricity to the national grid at times of peak demand, a full turnkey installation built by Clarke Energy to fit on a limited footprint.

Vishnu Barran, Sales and Business Development Manager, Clarke Energy

3:45 – 4:15 p.m. :: Hydrogen Blending: Pilot Projects for Power Generation Facilities

As utilities are looking to carbonize their power generation assets, hydrogen is emerging as a potential pathway to achieve their CO2 reduction targets because it is a noncarbon-emitting fuel when combusted. However, due to the uncertainty of how some of these assets will operate as hydrogen is introduced into the system, many facilities are looking to implement pilot-testing programs to temporarily blend and burn hydrogen with the natural gas fuel to measure performance before committing to large capital investments for permanent hydrogen co-firing capabilities. This presentation will include multiple real examples of hydrogen blending pilot projects (for both gas turbine and reciprocating engine plants) and focus on the key aspects of implementing the hydrogen blending/burning demonstration tests.

Nicholas Klein, Mechanical Engineer, Burns & McDonnell

4:15 – 5:00 p.m. :: Overview of O&M Considerations for Reciprocating Engines

Research and development by engine manufacturers have continued to extend the life cycle and reduced the maintenance costs of operating reciprocating engines. This presentation will examine how variables such as type, speed, usage, number of cylinders, and plant configuration can impact the O&M considerations and performance of reciprocating engines.

Chris Gray, Head of Contracts and Sales, Operation & Maintenance Agreements, MAN PrimeServ, MAN Energy Solutions

Instructors

  • Vishnu Barran, Sales and Business Development Manager, Clarke Energy

  • Tim Carey, RICE Business Unit Manager, Burns and McDonnell

  • Michael Fiedler, Business Development Manager, Power Solutions, MAN Energy Solutions

  • Brian Fladger, Senior Manager Energy Consulting and Commercial Analytics, MAN Energy Solutions

  • Alex Gorosito, Regional Sales Manager, Power Solutions, MAN Energy Solutions

  • Chris Gray, Head of Contracts and Sales, Operation & Maintenance Agreements, MAN PrimeServ, MAN Energy Solutions

  • Todd Halling, Program Manager, Burns and McDonnell

  • Nicholas Klein, Mechanical Engineer, Burns & McDonnell

  • Dr. Andy Maxson, Program Manager, EPRI

  • George Ransom, Business Development Manager, Burns and McDonnell

  • Jon Rodriguez, Engine Business Director, Wärtsilä Energy

  • Allan Schurr, Chief Commercial Officer, Enchanted Rock Solutions

Online Delivery

We will be using Microsoft Teams to facilitate your participation in the upcoming event. You do not need to have an existing Teams account in order to participate in the broadcast – the course will play in your browser and you will have the option of using a microphone to speak with the room and ask questions, or type any questions in via the chat window and our on-site representative will relay your question to the instructor.

  • You will receive a meeting invitation will include a link to join the meeting.
  • Separate meeting invitations will be sent for the morning and afternoon sessions of the course.
    • You will need to join the appropriate meeting at the appropriate time.
  • If you are using a microphone, please ensure that it is muted until such time as you need to ask a question.
  • The remote meeting connection will be open approximately 30 minutes before the start of the course. We encourage you to connect as early as possible in case you experience any unforeseen problems.

Register

Please Note: This event is being conducted entirely online. All attendees will connect and attend from their computer, one connection per purchase. For details please see our FAQ

If you are unable to attend at the scheduled date and time, we make recordings available to all registrants for three business days after the event

REGISTER NOW FOR THIS EVENT:

Reciprocating Engines for Operational Reliability and Resilience

November 30, 2022 | Online
Individual attendee(s) - $ 895.00 each

Volume pricing also available

Individual attendee tickets can be mixed with ticket packs for complete flexibility

Pack of 5 attendees - $ 3,580.00 (20% discount)
Pack of 10 attendees - $ 6,265.00 (30% discount)
Pack of 20 attendees - $ 10,740.00 (40% discount)

Your registration may be transferred to a member of your organization up to 24 hours in advance of the event. Cancellations must be received on or before October 28, 2022 in order to be refunded and will be subject to a US $195.00 processing fee per registrant. No refunds will be made after this date. Cancellations received after this date will create a credit of the tuition (less processing fee) good toward any other EUCI event. This credit will be good for six months from the cancellation date. In the event of non-attendance, all registration fees will be forfeited. In case of conference cancellation, EUCIs liability is limited to refund of the event registration fee only. For more information regarding administrative policies, such as complaints and refunds, please contact our offices at 303-770-8800

CEUs

Credits

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EUCI is accredited by the International Accreditors for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) and offers IACET CEUs for its learning events that comply with the ANSI/IACET Continuing Education and Training Standard. IACET is recognized internationally as a standard development organization and accrediting body that promotes quality of continuing education and training.

EUCI is authorized by IACET to offer 0.6 CEUs for this event

Requirements for Successful Completion of Program

Participants must log in and be in attendance for the entirety of the conference to be eligible for continuing education credit.

Instructional Methods

PowerPoint presentations, video, and Q&A will be used in the program.


Upon successful completion of this event, program participants interested in receiving CPE credits will receive a certificate of completion.

Course CPE Credits: 7.0
There is no prerequisite for this Course.
Program field of study: Specialized Knowledge
Program Level: Basic
Delivery Method: Group Internet Based
Advanced Preparation: None

CpeEUCI is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its web site: www.nasbaregistry.org

 

Who Should Attend

  • Electric Utilities
  • Gas Utilities
  • EPCs
  • Engineers
  • Business Development Managers
  • Asset Strategy Managers
  • Forecasting Managers
  • Plant Managers
  • Power Production Managers
  • Planning Consultants
  • Directors of Emerging Technologies
  • Resource Planning Professionals
  • EPCs
  • Plant Construction Managers
  • Consultants
  • Investors and Financers

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