Serving the energy industry for over 30 years
By - Jon Brown

Hawaii Power Summit 2016
Prioritizing the Challenges Ahead
December 1-2, 2016 | Honolulu, HI

Overview

Hawaii has embarked on one of the most aggressive paths toward energy sustainability on the planet.  The intended outcomes are twofold:

  • To replace the Island state’s dependence of imported oil as a primary fuel source with 100% renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, by 2045
  • To reduce the state’s steeply expensive consumer electricity prices

The Hawaii Public Utility Commission, the islands’ utilities, third-party service providers and stakeholders are locked in a fierce embrace to advance these objectives.  Not surprisingly, there are often significant differences in how these varying perspectives advocate for the attainment of these outcomes.  Each of the multiple regulatory initiatives in process have the potential to re-shape the power landscape in the islands, and the relationship between consumers and producers.

The Hawaii Power Summit will explore the options and trade-offs necessary for the Islands to achieve the RPS mandate and electricity bill reduction, and that:

  • Balance the capital required with technology and service transformations that enhance the ability to attain both objectives
  • Examine whether each island is able to optimize its own renewable resources, or whether the uniform policies should apply to all the islands
  • Benefit from “lessons learned” both locally and in other high penetration renewable energy and Island grid environments
  • Stimulate Hawaii-specific applications and innovations
  • Recognize the role that power consumers can play in the development and deployment of distributed energy resources that can benefit the grid

Learning Outcomes

    • Assess what “best practices” Hawaii needs to implement to realize the common objective of reducing its reliance on imported oil and attaining its RPS goal of 100% renewables by 2045
    • Review multiple scenarios for addressing the problems associated with high penetration PV on distribution circuits and the bulk power systems
    • Discuss the role of storage technology and applications to facilitate the integration of renewable energy on the Hawaiian grids
    • Interpret the future impact of distributed solar energy towards the 100% renewable energy mandate in a post-net energy metering (NEM) landscape
    • Describe the available demand resources (DR) and other demand side resources and what can they contribute towards the 100% renewable requirement
    • Indicate the capital requirements necessary to attain the renewable portfolio standards (RPS) mandate and what their sources will be
    • Assess the future of Hawaii’s power delivery options
    • Evaluate the future of cost-of-service regulation in Hawaii
    • Examine the impact of load management and TOU rates in Hawaii
    • Discuss the future direction of solar consumer grid supply (CGS) vs self supply (CSS)
    • Review how thermal energy storage might serve as “virtual batteries” in Hawaii to reduce peak electric demand on the grid

Credits

AP_Logo

EUCI has been accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).  In obtaining this accreditation, EUCI has demonstrated that it  complies with the ANSI/IACET Standard which is recognized internationally as a standard of good practice. As a result of their Authorized Provider status, EUCI is authorized to offer IACET CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET Standard.

EUCI is authorized by IACET to offer 1.2 CEUs for this conference and 0.6 for the workshop.

Requirements for Successful Completion of Program

Participants must sign in/out each day and be in attendance for the entirety of the conference to be eligible for continuing education credit.

Instructional Methods

This program will use a combination of PowerPoint presentations, case studies and panel discussions.

Agenda

Thursday, December 1, 2016

7:30 – 8:00 a.m. :: Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. :: Aloha and Overview

8:30 – 9:30 a.m. :: Scoping Renewable Energy and Power System Project Development Opportunities in Hawaii
  • Where are the needs?
  • What are the opportunities for collaboration with the utilities?
  • What are the opportunities for development independent of the utilities?
  • What are the (procurement or offering) mechanisms to facilitate project development opportunities?
  • Can the [gap/discrepancy] between capacity vs delivered energy be narrowed?
  • What renewable energy sources are realistically permittable?
  • What are some of the challenges associated with procurement and contract administration?

Ashley Wald, Partner, Holland & Hart

Josh Meyers, Director – Hawaii Operations, REC Solar

Lyman Morikawa, Principal, Morikawa & Associates

Rodney Chong, Manager – Renewable Acquisition, Hawaiian Electric Co.

9:30 – 10:30 a.m. :: The Future of Hawaii’s Power Delivery Options
  • Status quo
  • New utility player(s)
  • Participation of non-utility service/technology providers
  • Customer (distributed) participation roles
  • Potential for community-based renewable development
  • Comparison/contrast to other state power system transformations
  • Relationship to attainment of clean energy goals
  • The impact of moving to performance-based rates
  • Utility compact

Hon. Lorraine H. Akiba, Commissioner, Hawaii Public Utility Commission

John Cole, Senior Policy Analyst, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI)

Jeff Cramer, Executive Director, Coalition for Community Solar Access

Paul Karaffa, Project Manager, AES Energy Storage

Michael Jung, Director – Government Relations, Silver Spring Networks

10:30 – 10:50 a.m. :: Morning Break

10:50 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. :: Solar Consumer Grid Supply (CGS) vs Self Supply (CSS): Now What?
  • Relationship to storage
  • Cap considerations
  • Energy management options

Jim Alberts, Senior Vice President Customer Service, Hawaiian Electric Company

Marco Mangelsdorf, President, ProVision Solar

Rick Reed, President – Hawaii Solar Energy Association and President, Inter Island Solar Supply

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. :: Group Luncheon

1:00 – 2:15 p.m. :: Are the Economics of Battery Storage in Hawaii “In the Money” Yet?
  • Correctly determine the combined net worth of a system
  • What types of storage make sense in Hawaii?
  • Long-term influence of new consumer self-supply (CSS) solar
  • Setting the regulatory table for investment in storage
  • Grid support functions
  • PV-specific applications
  • Impact on utility revenues
  • Distinguishing between end-user, utility and third-party ownership
  • Monetization of the positive attributes of PV and PV with energy storage
  • Case studies of solar facility with battery storage
  • The financial, economics, and risk exposure equation

Bill Capp, President, Grid Storage Consulting

Chris DeBone, Managing Director, Hawaii Energy Connection

Henry Curtis, Executive Director & Vice President, Life of the Land

2:15 – 3:30 p.m. :: Thermal Energy and Storage – “Virtual Batteries” that Reduce Peak Electric Demand on the Grid

With the proliferation of renewable technologies (like wind and solar), thermal energy storage (TES) systems are becoming more valuable as a mechanism to store the electric power generated by these variable and unpredictable energy sources. At a grid level, these TES systems act as large virtual batteries, storing megawatts of electrical power in the form of chilled or heated water and thereby reducing the stress on the electric grid by shifting electric demand and consumption from on-peak periods to off-peak periods.  At a consumer level, the daily charging and discharging TES systems provide owners with the flexibility to permanently lower their peak electric demand, while reducing their energy consumption.   This discussion will cover the following topics:

  • The storage benefits of TES systems and their potential impact on the electric grid of Hawaii
  • The potential financial benefits that TES systems can bring to an owner
  • Case studies of TES systems in utility operation

Guy Frankenfield, Energy Business Unit Leader, DN Tanks

Leslie Cole-Brooks, Executive Director, Distributed Energy Resources (DER) Council

Michael Hopkins, CEO, Ice Energy

3:30 – 3:45 p.m. :: Afternoon Break

3:45 – 4:30 p.m. :: What Role Can Combined Heat/Power, Geothermal and Related Technologies Play?

Solar and wind draw attention as the dominant players in Hawaii’s path to achieve the 100% renewable mandate by 2045.  Yet, other technologies such as geothermal, combined heat and power can play a significant role as well.  This segment will examine where these opportunities lie and what they may contribute to the attainment of this outcome.

Steve Lowe, Director, Granite Power

Roger Swenson, Chief Development Officer, Clean Development International

4:30 – 5:30 p.m. :: What are the Available Demand Response (DR) and Other Demand Side Resources and What Can They Contribute Towards the 100% Renewable Requirement?
  • Load reduction and control measures
  • Applicable contribution areas
    • Capacity resource
    • Peak reduction
    • Valley filling
    • Slower reserves
  • Customer participation drivers
    • Incentives vs mandates
    • Kuleana
  • Industry participation drivers
  • Contribution targets
  • Gauging performance

Caroline Carl, Deputy Director, Hawaii Energy

5:30 – 6:30 p.m. :: Networking Reception


Friday, December 2, 2016

7:30 – 8:00 a.m. :: Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 9:15 a.m. :: The Impact of Load Management and TOU Rates in Hawaii
  • Reduction in total peak demand
  • More gradual ramping requirement toward the peak demand “Duck Curve”
  • Declining customer bills due to demand reduction

Jim Lazar, Senior Advisor, Regulatory Assistance Project

Brian Kealoha, Executive Director, Hawaii Energy

Makena Coffman, Associate Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Lani Shinsato, Manager – Strategic Dockets, Hawaiian Electric Co.

9:15 – 10:30 a.m. :: The Future of Cost-of-Service Regulation in Hawaii
  • The interplay of the four major dockets
    • Demand response
    • Distributed energy resources
    • Power supply improvement plans
    • Decoupling
  • Incentives around innovating using third party capital
  • Adjustments in other states, such as New York “REV”
    • Platform-service revenues (PSRs)
    • Earning adjustment mechanisms (EAMs)

Dean Nishina, Acting Executive Director – Division of Consumer Advocacy, State of Hawaii (invited)

Brent Gale, Principal & Senior Energy Consultant, StrataG Consulting

David Parsons, Chief of Policy and Research, Hawaii Public Utility Commission

10:30 – 10:45 a.m. :: Morning Break

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. :: What Will Be the Capital Requirements to Attain the 100% Renewable Mandate and What Will Their Sources Be?
  • Large-scale system requirements
    • Order of magnitude
    • Timing
  • Small-scale system requirements
    • Order of magnitude
    • Timing
  • Is the existing utility compact adequate to provide the necessary funds?
  • Will third-party ownership of grid assets be necessary to supplement the existing utility compact?
  • How much of the expenses for these capital requirements can be borne by the ratepayers?
  • Would public ownership of utilities accentuate or relieve challenges related to capital sufficiency to re-form the grid?
  • Does grid diversification automatically result in grid defection?
  • Will the costs associated with achieving the RPS mandate still keep customer power costs high?
  • How are other jurisdictions with aggressive RPS mandates dealing with capital requirements?

Joe Boivin, Senior Vice President, Hawaii Gas

Tom Starrs, Vice President – Market Strategy and Policy, SunPower Corp

Clay Murray, Managing Partner, Ulupono Initiative

Fred Mayes, Senior Technology Analyst, U.S. Energy Information Agency (EIA)

Shelee Kimura, Vice President – Corporate Planning & Business Development, Hawaiian Electric Co.

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. :: Group Luncheon

1:00 – 2:30 p.m. :: It Will Take More than a Village to Achieve the 100% Renewable Mandate by 2045

Discussion by the U.S. Navy, Hawaiian Electric Company, the state energy office (DBEDT) and stakeholders as to the joint use development of a 20 Megawatt Solar Facility at the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, West Loch Annex and other collaborations towards ensuring a more sustainable grid.

2:30 – 3:45 p.m. :: Does the 100% Renewable Mandate Really Give Hawaii What It Wants and Needs?

Panel Discussion

Erik Kvam, Founder & Managing Director, Hawaii Energy Law Services

Jeff Mikulina, Executive Director, Blue Planet Foundation

Jay Griffin, Senior Policy Analyst, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI)

Scott Seu, Vice President – System Operations, Hawaiian Electric Co.

Carlito Caliboso, Partner, Yamamoto Caliboso LLC

3:45 p.m. :: Conference Adjourns

Workshop

Deep Dive into System Issues Associated With High Penetration of Solar and Wind

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

7:30 – 8:00 a.m.  :: Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. :: Workshop Timing

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. :: Group Luncheon

Overview

The promise of solar and wind as “game-changers” that can transform the retail electricity business is already on display in the Hawaiian islands.  It has come about through a “perfect storm” of conditions:

  • The underlying, high cost of electricity
  • Generous, tax-preferred development incentives
  • Excellent solar “resources”
  • Liberal rate policy for excess generation sent back to the grid

With the promise, however, comes technical challenges to deal with the rapid and concentrated onset of solar, wind and other renewable energy resources and their impact on the grid.  The variable and intermittent nature of these (mostly) distributed energy resources introduce challenging conditions that undermine stable operation of the grid.  This reliability issue is further exacerbated on the stand-alone islands of Hawaii, where the separate, unconnected power systems are limited in their ability to draw on supplemental resources to stay in balance.  This workshop will document the issues at the transmission and distribution (feeder) circuit levels, and what utilities and system operators can do to reduce the problems.  It will also examine some of the regulatory, policy and economic measures that influence how these issues can be managed going forward.

Learning Outcomes

Workshop attendees will:

  • Assess technical issues associated with high penetration of solar and wind — distribution, transmission and system wide
  • Examine the impact of the updated interconnection rule (Rule 14H) on system operations
  • Evaluate the findings of hosting capacity and other studies
  • Discuss the common challenges that utilities, installers and other interconnection agents are running into as they engage in the interconnection process
  • Assess the design and mitigation measures that utilities and system operators are employing to deal with certain challenges

Agenda

Overview
  • Hawaii’s mandate to achieve 100% Renewables by 2045
  • 100% Renewable is not the hardest challenge; it is 100% Variable Resources
  • High percentage renewable achievements around the world
  • 100% Renewable energy means >>100% power – creates the “Duck Curve”
  • Potential impact on consumer energy costs
  • Will need to use all the technical and regulatory tools in the tool box
System wide issues
  • Low Inertia
  • Definition
  • Characteristics and unique properties
  • Examples
  • Frequency Control
  • Variable Resources (primarily solar and wind)
  • Minute-to-minute
  • Hourly
  • Seasonally
  • Predictability
  • Technical and regulatory tools available
 Considering the Integration of Renewables at the Bulk Power Systems Level
  • Managing system frequency by balancing generation and load
  • Impacts (both positive and negative) of distributed generation on system transient response
  • Centralized vs aggregated resources
    • Generation
    • Storage
    • Load/demand management
      • Procurement models for each
      • Cutting edge technology and integration of renewables for grid and ancillary services
Considering the Integration of Renewables at the Distribution Level
  • Will require a new approach to Distribution Planning Process
  • Rule 14H (Interconnection Rule) revisions
    • Connected but non-export
    • Connected but minimal export
    • Operating in parallel
  • Dealing with midday over-generation of solar PV energy
    • Sophisticated grid integrated water heater (GIWH)
    • Other behind-the-meter energy storage
  • Is California’s Distribution Resources Plan (DRP) a possible template?
  • The impact of changes to the Net Energy Metering (NEM) program
  • Voltage impacts of high penetrations of renewables on distribution circuits
  • Best practices in commissioning that contribute to lower project risk
  • Impact on load and the load curve of behind-the-meter storage
  • Sub-distribution level
  • Relationship of cost to benefit
Mitigation strategies and solutions
  • Mitigation via rotating generation changes
  • Mitigation via changes to DERs
  • Mitigation via energy storage
    • Technology overview and trends
    • Storage Applications and Markets
    • Economics
    • Energy Storage in Hawaii
  • Demand Response
  • Mitigation of anti-islanding problem
  • Flexible AC Transmission Systems and other advanced technologies
Designing the System
  • Determining needed controls and contingent responses
  • Trade-offs between mitigation approaches – optimizing the resource mix

Workshop Instructors

Bill Capp, President, Grid Storage Consulting

Bill Capp is the Founder of Grid Storage Consulting (GSC), an advisory firm providing expertise to various stakeholders interested in improving the operation of electrical systems with advanced energy storage.  Clients include utilities interesting in learning about how to integrate storage, firms developing an energy storage strategy and financial entities evaluating potential energy storage investments.  Before founding GSC, Mr. Capp served Beacon Power as President and CEO for 10 years. He led Beacon’s technology development and commercial deployment efforts to align the company’s patented flywheel technology with grid-scale energy storage opportunities.  Beacon is frequently credited for leading the creation of markets for energy storage resources to provide frequency regulation services and subsequently for leading the effort to achieve “pay for performance” (FERC order 755).  The Beacon 20 MW regulation facility in the New York ISO was completed on time and budget in July 2011 and has been operating at over 95% availability ever since.  Prior to Beacon Power, Mr. Capp had a variety of general management, product development and manufacturing technology roles in Ford Motor Company, Ingersoll-Rand and York International.  He holds seven patents in diverse fields relating to sensors, micro-grids, photovoltaic systems, and grid services.  He holds a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University and a Masters in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan, where he also earned his MBA degree.

John Cole, Senior Policy Analyst, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI)

John Cole is a senior policy analyst at Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) at the University of Hawaii, with more than 16 years of experience in policy and utility regulation. He joined HNEI in 2012, overseeing various projects including grid modeling studies with General Electric, assessing the possible importation of LNG into Hawaii, and the Hawaii Clean Energy Programmatic EIS, as well as managing projects that are funded with the Institutes’ portion of the Hawaii Barrel Tax. Prior to joining HNEI, Mr. Cole served on the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission for six years. Mr. Cole has also served as Executive Director of the Division of Consumer Advocacy, Policy Advisor to former Governor Linda Lingle, and as an attorney in various public agencies, legislative offices, and a private firm. Mr. Cole earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from UH-Manoa and a law degree from Washington University School of Law in St. Louis.

Lyman Morikawa, Principal, Morikawa & Associates

Lyman Morikawa is a Principal Engineer of Morikawa & Associates, LLC.  He has been in the electrical business since the early 1970’s as an electrical engineer in power systems and power electronics dealing with the design and installation of power generation and distribution systems, water and wastewater treatment facilities, and institutional buildings.  Since the early 1990’s he has been involved with the design and implementation of solar renewable residential through utility-scale energy plants.  His current involvement is with implementation of energy storage systems for grid and non-grid connected systems.  Mr. Morikawa is a Licensed Professional Engineer in nine states and Guam.  He is an instructor at the University of Hawaii – Maui College teaching Photovoltaic and Energy Storage Classes, and also serves on the IEEE 1547 Working Group.  He received his Bachelor’s in Electrical Engineering Degree from Michigan Technological University and a Master’s in Business Administration from the University of Hawaii.

Speakers

The Hon. Lorraine H. Akiba, Commissioner, Hawaii Public Utility Commission

Jim Alberts, Senior Vice President Customer Service, Hawaiian Electric Company

Joe Boivin, Senior Vice President, Hawaii Gas

Carlito Caliboso, Partner, Yamamoto Caliboso LLC

Bill Capp, President, Grid Storage Consulting

Caroline Carl, Deputy Director, Hawaii Energy

Rodney Chong, Manager – Renewable Acquisition, Hawaiian Electric Co.

Makena Coffman, Associate Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Hawaii at Manoa

John Cole, Senior Policy Analyst, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI)

Leslie Cole-Brooks, Executive Director, Distributed Energy Resources (DER) Council

Jeff Cramer, Executive Director, Coalition for Community Solar Access

Henry Curtis, Executive Director & Vice President, Life of the Land

Chris DeBone, Managing Director, Hawaii Energy Connection

Guy Frankenfield, Energy Business Unit Leader, DN Tanks

Brent Gale, Principal & Senior Energy Consultant, StrataG Consulting

Mark Glick, Administrator – State Energy Office, Hawaii Dept of Business, Economic Development & Tourism (DBEDT)

Jay Griffin, Senior Policy Analyst, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI)

Jeremy Hargreaves, Managing Consultant, Energy+Environmental Economics (E3)

Michael Hopkins, CEO, Ice Energy

Michael Jung, Director – Government Relations, Silver Spring Networks

Paul Karaffa, Project Manager, AES Energy Storage

Brian Kealoha, Executive Director, Hawaii Energy

Shelee Kimura, Vice President – Corporate Planning & Business Development, Hawaiian Electric Co.

Erik Kvam, Founder & Managing Director, Hawaii Energy Law Services

Jim Lazar, Senior Advisor, Regulatory Assistance Project

Steve Lowe, Director, Granite Power

Marco Mangelsdorf, President, ProVision Solar

Fred Mayes, Senior Technology Analyst, U.S. Energy Information Agency (EIA)

Josh Meyers, Director – Hawaii Operations, REC Solar

Jeff Mikulina, Executive Director, Blue Planet Foundation

Lyman Morikawa, Principal, Morikawa & Associates

Clay Murray, Managing Partner, Ulupono Initiative

Dean Nishina, Acting Executive Director – Division of Consumer Advocacy, State of Hawaii (invited)

David Parsons, Chief of Policy and Research, Hawaii Public Utility Commission

Rick Reed, President – Hawaii Solar Energy Association and President, Inter Island Solar Supply

Scott Seu, Vice President – System Operations, Hawaiian Electric Co.

Lani Shinsato, Manager – Strategic Dockets, Hawaiian Electric Co.

Tom Starrs, Vice President – Market Strategy and Policy, SunPower Corp

Roger Swenson, Chief Development Officer, Clean Development International

Ashley Wald, Partner, Holland & Hart

Location

Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort
2005 Kalia Road
Honolulu, HI 96815

To reserve your room, please call 1-808-949-4321
Please indicate that you are with the EUCI group to receive the group rate.

Room Rate:

The room rate is $200 single or double plus $20 resort fee and applicable taxes.

Room Block Dates:

A room block has been reserved for the nights of November 30 – December 2, 2016.

Rate Available Until:

Make your reservations prior to November 18, 2016. There are a limited number of rooms available at the conference rate. Please make your reservations early.

Register

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