Smart Inverters Summit
What Utilities, System Operators and Project Developers Need to Know
November 7-8, 2017
Denver, CO

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Overview

For a power grid that was conceived and developed around the concept of a centrally managed generation grid with complementary hub-and-spoke distribution system, the phenomenon of increasing penetrations of solar photovoltaic (PV) and other distributed generation systems requires a more flexible grid management approach.  To veteran power engineers whose careers have been devoted to ensuring a safe and non-disruptive flow to the network, greater penetration of PVDG warrants adaptations to that legacy transmission and distribution system on multiple fronts: consistent integrated systems reliability, circuit saturation, power quality issues and voltage fluctuations, inverter grid support and grounding options.

This conference, featuring many of the industry’s foremost technical experts, will examine the local distribution and bulk power impacts triggered by the penetration of solar, and how smart inverters can assist utilities, system operators and project developers address those challenges.  It will consider the regulatory and administrative efforts to develop more uniform codes and standards, where smart inverters are being deployed and where they’re not, and how they are being implemented in practice. 

Learning Outcomes

Utilities, leading national lab research specialists and technology service providers will cover these topics:

  • Discuss regulatory changes just adopted and still under consideration for smart inverter implementation
  • Identify operational challenges and opportunities created by smart inverters
  • Review of standards driving smart inverters
  • Assess distribution system operators’ views and considerations of smart inverter deployment
  • Compare utility applications of standards and adoption of smart inverters
  • Examine case studies of utility implementation of smart inverters
  • Evaluate what’s next for advanced inverter codes and standards
  • Consider the role(s) that utilities play in smart inverter grid Implementation

Credits

AP_Logo

EUCI has been accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).  In obtaining this accreditation, EUCI has demonstrated that it  complies with the ANSI/IACET Standard which is recognized internationally as a standard of good practice. As a result of their Authorized Provider status, EUCI is authorized to offer IACET CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET Standard.

EUCI is authorized by IACET to offer 1.0 CEUs for this conference, 0.7 CEUs for the pre-conference workshop and 0.4 CEUs for the post-conference workshop.

 

Instructional Methods

PowerPoint presentations and case studies will be used in program.

Requirements For Successful Completion Of Program

Participants must sign in/out each day and be in attendance for the entirety of the conference to be eligible for continuing education credit.

Agenda

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. :: Registration & Continental Breakfast

8:30 – 8:45 a.m. :: Overview and Introductions


8:45 – 10:15 a.m. :: Survey of the Landscape

  • Grid and system conditions that are prompting smart inverter deployment
    • Phenomenon of shift from centralized to more distributed grid
      • Social and market drivers
      • Technology advances
    • Bulk system conditions and consequences
    • Local system conditions and consequences
    • Where smart inverters come in to the picture
  • Role(s) of advanced inverters in accommodating increasing renewable energy penetration and distributed generation (DG) scenarios
  • Challenges and application-specific issues for different types of inverter applications
    • DC prime movers
    • Variable frequency AC prime movers
    • Storage—separated from the two above because real power flow is bidirectional
  • Technical improvements that mark the transition to “smart” inverters
    • Power electronics and autonomous grid support functionality
    • Communications-based functionality and capabilities
    • Interface with other grid control automations systems, software and protocols
  • Which of these capabilities are required now
  • Which of these capabilities are more for the future
  • Where inverter capability is today

John Berdner, Vice President – Regulatory Compliance, HiQ Solar

Michael Coddington, Principal Engineer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Dr. Andy Hoke, Senior Engineer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

10:15 – 10:45 a.m. :: Networking Break


10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. :: Challenges and Opportunities Created by Smart Inverters

  • Load-rejection and ground-fault overvoltage
  • Single-line open detection
  • Role of inverters in improving power system performance
  • New issues surrounding unintentional islanding
  • Microgrid-ready capabilities including black-start and synthetic inertia
  • Dynamic current support
  • Frequency deviation support
  • Limit reactive power
  • Schedule output and/or modes at PCC
  • Protection

Dr. Mike Ropp, President, Northern Plains Power Technologies

12:15 – 1:30 p.m. :: Group Luncheon


1:30 – 5:15 p.m. :: Standards Driving Smart Inverters Development and Deployment

  • Update
    • UL 1741 and UL1741-SA
    • IEEE P1547 FR (full revision)
    • IEEE P1547.1 (testing standard)
    • IEEE 2030
    • IEEE P2030.8
    • Calif Rule 21
    • HI Rule 14H
    • NERC PRC-024
  • What’s Next
    • Communications
    • Manufacturers’ insights on implementation
    • Field testing and commissioning

Ward Bower, Ward Bower Innovations LLC

Brian Lydic, Regulatory Program Engineer, Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC)

Charlie Vartanian, Territorial Manager – Power Systems Group, Mitsubishi Electric Power Products (MEPPI)

Tim Zgonena, Principal Engineer – Distributed Energy Resources Equipment & Systems, UL


Wednesday, November 8, 2017

7:30 – 8:00 a.m. :: Continental Breakfast


8:00 – 9:00 a.m. :: Considerations that Influence Smart Inverter Deployment

  • Regulatory
  • Utility/distribution system operators
  • Bulk power system
  • Manufacturers

Michael Coddington, Principal Engineer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Ray Hudson, Segment Director – Solar, DNV GL – Energy

Ward Bower, Ward Bower Innovations LLC

Jeffrey Kwan, Utilities Engineer – Grid Planning and Reliability Section and Smart Inverter Working Group (SIWG), California Public Utilities Commission


9:00 – 10:00 a.m. :: Survey of Utility Applications of Standards

  • Where “smart” inverter functions are being authorized
  • Where “smart” inverters are not being adopted or are under review
    • Incremental adoption
    • Omnibus adoption
    • No thanks (Reject Adoption)

Brian Lydic, Regulatory Program Engineer, IREC

10:00 – 10:15 a.m. :: Morning Break


10:15 – 11:45 a.m. :: Utility Case Studies of Smart Inverter Adoption

  • System requirements necessary for enabling advanced features
  • Determining which advanced features to use
  • Regulatory and stakeholder engagement
  • Budget considerations
  • Determining set-points
  • Deployment options
    • Dispatch requests
    • Autonomous

John Berdner, Vice President – Regulatory Compliance, HiQ Solar

Darren Ishimura, Grid Technologies Manager, Hawaiian Electric (invited)

Marc Romito, Director – Customer Technology, APS

Workshops

Practical Issues in the Utility Deployment of Smart Inverters

Monday, November 6, 2017

Overview

The deployment of so-called “smart inverters” with distributed energy resources (DERs) provides an excellent opportunity to utilize the capabilities of power electronics in a much more complete and modern way.  However, this technology, like all technologies, comes with limitations, constraints, and challenges, and it is critically important that practitioners in the field understand the full context in order to get maximum benefit while avoiding pitfalls.  This workshop is designed to provide that context and to stimulate discussion among people working in this area regarding where “smart inverter functions” can benefit us in the near and medium-term, where the limits of the technology currently are, what it may take to overcome some of those limits, and how to roll out smart-inverter deployments starting today.

Learning Outcomes

  • Examine the technical challenges faced by utilities in implementing smart inverter functions
  • Assess key differences between dispersed DER plants and large centralized plants, from the bulk EPS perspective
  • Identify the multiple opportunities for utilities provided by “smart inverter functions”
  • Analyze cost/benefit trade-offs of utility smart inverter deployment

Agenda

Monday, November 6, 2017

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. :: Registration & Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. :: Workshop Timing

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. :: Group Luncheon


Technical challenges in implementing smart inverter functions

  • What functions are good for addressing what problems
    • Applications of Volt-VAR control vs. constant or scheduled PF control
    • Freq-Watt and bulk system stability
    • Volt-Watt
  • Conflicts between Bulk EPS and Area EPS needs. Basically, ride-throughs versus:
    • Anti-islanding
    • TrOV mitigation
    • Protection and coordination
  • Possible dynamic interactions between:
    • Functions—for example, Volt-VAR and freq-Watt
    • Inverters on the same circuit
    • Inverters and other voltage regulation equipment
  • How do you choose the parameters for the functions?
  • Inverter deployment and retrofits
    • No inverters
      • Case study
    • Already penetrated system
      • Discuss the German example

Key differences between dispersed DER plants and large centralized plants, from the bulk EPS perspective

  • Many of these are in the category of “high-pen” problems—lots of overlap.
  • There’s an assumption that large aggregates of DER plants can act “just like” large central plants. When and how does that break down?
    • Reduction in available fault current
    • Reduction in system inertia
    • Limitations to the ability of distribution to export power
  • Fulfilling the promise of DERs that are “good citizens of the grid”
    • Technical factors
    • Economic factors

Key opportunities provided by “smart inverter functions”

  • Microgrid readiness—positive impacts on
    • System reliability
    • Storm and “event” hardness
  • Greatly improved system flexibility, both technically and economically
  • Driver for further advancements in power electronics at multiple power and voltage scales
    • FACTS devices—DVRs, SVCs, UPFs…
    • Solid-state transformers
  • Ability to take fuller advantage of energy storage

Cost/Benefit analyses of utility smart inverter deployment

Instructor

Michael Ropp is President and Principal Engineer of Northern Plains Power Technologies.  Dr. Ropp has nearly 20 years of experience in power engineering, power electronics, and photovoltaics.  His experience encompasses computer modeling of power systems; grid integration of distributed energy resources (DERs); design, modeling, fabrication and testing of power electronic converters (DC-DC and DC-AC); modeling, control, and monitoring of energy storage systems; and the design, system integration, control and dynamics, protection, and seamless grid integration of low-inertia systems (microgrids).  He has especially deep expertise in:  detection and prevention of unintentional islanding; temporary and transient overvoltages in distribution systems, especially those associated with DERs; integration of DERs into high-reliability zones and FLISR/ASR schemes; calculation of and issues associated with ground return current; effective protection techniques for power systems with current-limited sources; and planning, design, commissioning/testing, dynamics and control of smaller (< 20 MW) power systems with rotating and inverter-based sources, with and without storage, including microgrids.   Dr. Ropp has worked in nearly every aspect of photovoltaics, from solar cell fabrication through on- and off-grid system design.  Recent work has also included modeling and protection of AC and DC railway electric traction power supply systems.  He has authored over fifty technical publications and presently holds two patents.  He is a Senior Member of the IEEE and is active in standards creation, and is a registered Professional Engineer in South Dakota and Hawaii.  Dr. Ropp received the Bachelor’s degree in Music from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1991, and the Masters and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 1996 and 1998, respectively, from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

 


Ways to Model Smart Inverters

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Overview

Distribution systems are facing an increase in PV penetration. Computer modeling of distribution feeders with a high density of advanced inverters can be quite challenging.  An appropriate computer model development for enabling an engineer to study various effects of advanced PV installation and accurate assessment of the reactive power support and active power curtailment studies will be explored.

PV generators can have a number of different impacts on distribution systems, and utility engineers need to be aware of the potential problems, and also of what problems are to be expected. However, nearly every PV plant installation is unique in at least some regard, and thus it is difficult to know in advance where the problems might be. Experimentation is not an option; because of the risks to real-world customers, one cannot install the PV plant and wait to see if something goes wrong.

This workshop will delve into the modeling of distribution feeders with high penetration of advanced inverters. The emphasis will be on examining various scenarios of concern, and elucidating which tools are appropriate for specific applications. The end goal will be to help navigate the “alphabet soup” of modeling more effectively. Although no specific modeling tool will be endorsed and proprietary details cannot be given, example situations using various tools will be demonstrated as appropriate.

Learning Outcomes

  • Review the specific impacts of high PV penetration scenarios and need for modeling smart inverter modes
  • Discuss and understand the hardware operations of smart inverters
  • Identify the need for dynamic models and findings from transient analysis
  • Recognize the complexities associated with quasi-static computer models, and how to deal with them

Agenda

12:30 – 1:00 p.m. :: Registration

1:00 – 4:30 p.m. :: Workshop Timing


Overview of the impacts of PV plants on distribution feeders and capabilities of advanced inverters to address in modeling

  1. Voltage rise
  2. Interference with voltage regulation equipment
  3. Ramp rate issues
  4. Interference with CVR
  5. Temporary/transient overvoltage
  6. Risk of unintentional islanding
  7. Harmonics
  8. Flicker

Modeling of advanced inverters

  1. Why modeling?
  2. Types of modeling needed in various scenarios
    • Time-series modeling (“quasi-static”)
    • Transient
  3. Tools and capabilities
    • Different types of tools
      1. Steady-state and load flow tools
      2. Time-series, steady-state tools (“quasi-static”)
      3. Transient modeling tools
    • Brief look into the math behind the tools
    • Strengths, weaknesses, and appropriate applications of each type of tool
  4. Brief survey and categorization of power system modeling tools
    • Examples from each category
    • Choosing a simulation tool

Instructors

Adarsh Nagarajan is a Research Engineer in Power System Design and Studies at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with a focus in power electronics/power functions relating to clean energy systems. .  His experience encompasses computer modeling of power systems; grid integration of distributed energy resources (DERs); design, modeling, fabrication and testing of power electronic converters (DC-DC and DC-AC); modeling, control, and monitoring of energy storage systems; and the design, system integration, control and dynamics, protection, and seamless grid integration of low-inertia systems (microgrids).  He has especially deep expertise in:  modeling advanced inverter operation modes in distribution systems, especially those associated with DERs. He has authored over twenty technical publications.  He is a Member of the IEEE and is active in standards creation.  Dr. Nagarajan received Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2014, from Arizona State University.


Brian Johnson is a Research Engineer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).  He was awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship in 2010. He currently serves as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion. His research interests are in renewable energy systems, power electronics, and control systems.  Dr. Johnson received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, in 2010 and 2013, respectively.


Barry Mather is Senior Engineer – Power Sys. Engineering Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). 


Andy Hoke is a Research Engineer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Speakers

John Berdner, Vice President – Regulatory Compliance, HiQ Solar

Ward Bower, Ward Bower Innovations LLC

Michael Coddington, Principal Engineer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Dr. Andy Hoke, Senior Engineer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Ray Hudson, Segment Director – Solar, DNV GL – Energy

Darren Ishimura, Grid Technologies Manager, Hawaiian Electric (invited)

Jeffrey Kwan, Utilities Engineer – Grid Planning and Reliability Section and Smart Inverter Working Group (SIWG), California Public Utilities Commission

Brian Lydic, Regulatory Program Engineer, Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC)

Marc Romito, Director – Customer Technology, APS

Dr. Mike Ropp, President, Northern Plains Power Technologie

Charlie Vartanian, Territorial Manager – Power Systems Group, Mitsubishi Electric Power Products (MEPPI)

Tim Zgonena, Principal Engineer – Distributed Energy Resources Equipment & Systems, UL

 

Location

Courtyard Denver Cherry Creek
1475 S. Colorado Blvd
Denver  Colorado  80222 

To reserve your room, please call 1-303-757-8797
Please indicate that you are with the EUCI group to receive the group rate.

Room Rate:

The room rate is $145.00 single or double plus applicable taxes.

Room Block Dates:

A room block has been reserved for the nights of November 5 – 6, 2017.

Rate Available Until:

Make your reservations prior to October 15, 2017. There are a limited number of rooms available at the conference rate. Please make your reservations early.

Register

Please Note: Confirmed speakers do not need to register and are encouraged to participate in all sessions of the event. If you are a speaker and have any questions please contact our offices at 1.303.770.8800

EventEarly Bird Before
Friday, October 20, 2017
Standard RateAttendees
Smart Inverters SummitUS $ 1195.00 US $ 1395.00

This event has the following workshops:

Practical Issues in the Utility Deployment of Smart InvertersUS $ 895.00
US $ 995.00
Ways to Model Smart InvertersUS $ 495.00
US $ 595.00

Take advantage of these discounts!

  • Attend the Conference and both workshops and pay $2,395.00 per attendee (save $ 190.00 each)
  • Attend the Conference and workshop and pay $1,995.00 per attendee (save $95.00 each)

Register 3 Send 4th Free!

Any organization wishing to send multiple attendees to these conferences may send 1 FREE for every 3 delegates registered. Please note that all registrations must be made at the same time to qualify.

Cancellation Policy

Your registration may be transferred to a member of your organization up to 24 hours in advance of the event. Cancellations must be received on or before October 06, 2017 in order to be refunded and will be subject to a US $195.00 processing fee per registrant. No refunds will be made after this date. Cancellations received after this date will create a credit of the tuition (less processing fee) good toward any other EUCI event. This credit will be good for six months from the cancellation date. In the event of non-attendance, all registration fees will be forfeited. In case of conference cancellation, EUCIs liability is limited to refund of the event registration fee only. For more information regarding administrative policies, such as complaints and refunds, please contact our offices at 303-770-8800