By - Jon Brown

Advanced Battery Storage
October 23-24, 2019 | Denver, CO

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Overview

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A radical energy transformation is under way today, one that we will likely fully appreciate only in hindsight. Utility regulators and operators are beginning to rebuild the bulk power system to make it more resilient and better able to accommodate higher penetration levels of variable renewable generation. With more wind and solar coming onto the grid, long duration storage is the holy grail in energy. One of the prime movers in this energy transformation is the rapid advancement battery storage technologies.

There are different application characteristics, which underscore the need for different batteries and battery technologies. Some chemistries or technologies are better suited for short-duration power applications, whereas others are better suited for long-duration energy applications so no one battery is the ideal tool for all applications.

This course will provide an in-depth overview of the various types of long duration batteries. In addition, it will address things to consider such as battery characteristics, projected life, performance and safety.  It will look at battery storage applications, how to build a business case, utility scale implementations and system resiliency. The program will address storage design, implementations, operational risks and the future of battery storage.

Learning Outcomes

  • Review battery storage and other types of storage
  • Identify the various types of long duration batteries, the chemistry and how they work
  • Identify the major components in a Battery Energy Storage System (BESS)
  • Review the different battery storage applications including frequency regulation
  • Discuss the challenges associated with building a business case for battery storage
  • Discuss constraints and systems for utility scale implementations
  • Examine AC/DC coupled systems, what they do and advantages/disadvantages
  • Identify and mitigate energy storage design
  • Discuss the future of energy storage

 

Credits

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EUCI has been accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).  In obtaining this accreditation, EUCI has demonstrated that it  complies with the ANSI/IACET Standard which is recognized internationally as a standard of good practice. As a result of their Authorized Provider status, EUCI is authorized to offer IACET CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET Standard.

EUCI is authorized by IACET to offer 1.0 CEUs for this course and 0.4 CEUs for the workshop.

 

Requirements For Successful Completion Of Program

Participants must sign in/out each day and be in attendance for the entirety of the conference to be eligible for continuing education credit.

Instructional Methods

Case studies and PowerPoint presentations will be used in this program.

Agenda

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. :: Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m. – 4:45 p.m. :: Course Timing

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. :: Group Luncheon


Storage

    • Process, non-battery energy storage, batteries

Long Duration Batteries

    • Battery chemistry
    • Diversity of chemistry – 200 + and counting (periodic table illustration)
      • How it works
      • Potential failure mechanisms
    • Lithium-ion BESS
      • How they work
      • Family of chemistries – all with different characteristics
      • Energy density (Wh/cubic foot)
    • Flow batteries
      • Most “market ready” vendors
      • Iron and salt
      • Redux
      • Organic and others
    • Other choices in batteries
      • Advanced lead-based batteries
      • Sodium, fluorine, etc.
    • Things to know and thinkabout
      • Characteristics to think about
      • Projected life
      • Performance
    • Safety
      • NEC 700-705 and 855
      • IEEE 1547 and UL 1741
    • Major components in a BESS
      • A visual walk thru a typical BESS
        • Physical batteries (e.g. Li-ion)
        • Flow battery
      • Batteries
      • Environmental systems (HVAC, etc.)
      • Inverters
      • Controllers
      • Housings
      • Battery management system
      • Storage management system/Energy management systems
      • Market participation systems
      • Forecasting and analytics
      • Secondary containment
      • Substation
      • Fire suppression
      • Augmentation plan
      • Replacement plan

Battery Storage Usecases

    • Wholesale energy market
    • Distribution energy market
    • Utility operation
    • Renewable locations (e.g. Solar+Storage)
    • Residential
    • EV charging
    • Critical facilities
    •  Other

Building a Business Case

    • Typical benefit categories
    • Regional differences
      • PJM
      • ERCOT
      • CAISO
      • Other regions
    • Costs
      • Initial capital costs
      • Soft costs of initial placement (e.g. design, permits, etc.)
      • Interconnection
      • Operations
      • Augmentation and replacement
      • Other costs

4:45 p.m. :: Program Adjourns for Day

BONUS MATERIAL


4:45 – 5:45 p.m. :: A Review of all the Types of Storage that Exist (optional session)


Thursday, October 24, 2019

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. :: Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. :: Course Timing

 

  • Utility scale implementation
    • Lessons learned
      • Dealing with startups
      • Hidden factors
      • Fire protection
      • Public perception
      • Construction issues
    • Addressing local constraints and systems
    • How to avoid impacting end users
  • System resiliency
  • AC/DC coupled systems
    • Difference in efficiency
      • Lower losses
      • DC coupled to generation
      • DC coupled to DC loads
      • Issues with arc flash
    • Components involved
    • What they do
  • Design considerations
    • Li-Ion and other “square” batteries
    • Flow batteries
  • Implementation
    • Typical work plan at a high level
    • Typical timelines
  • Operational risks
  • Conducting inspections and maintenance
  • Assisting with refurbishing and/or decommissioning
    • Environmental considerations
    • Recycling
  • Integrators
  • The future of battery storage
    • What’s next
    • Ideal energy user profiles

12:00 p.m. :: Program Adjourns

Workshop

Building a Business Case for Your Individual Use Case

Thursday, October 24, 2019

12:30 – 1:00 p.m. :: Workshop Registration

1:00 – 4:45 p.m. :: Workshop Timing

Overview

This half day workshop will be highly interactive and individualized. You will move groups in the room for several rounds of work. The session will start with a blank template for estimating costs and benefits. In the first rounds of work the benefit categories will be worked in groups based on the use cases and the region, in the next rounds of work the costs will be worked based on the type and sizes of batteries.

Learning Outcomes

      • Discuss the challenges associated with building a business case for battery storage
      • Discuss choosing the right use case for your specific needs
      • Explain the differences between the regional markets
      • Explain the different costs associated with building a business case
      • Discuss how to build the correct battery size and type for your individual use case

 

Agenda

Introduction

      • Instructor introductions
      • Passing out the paper template and a quick overview

Choosing a use case

      • Overview of the eight most common use cases
      • Moving to the right use case group
      • Filling in use case specifics of the template

Regionalizing your use case

      • Introduction to the regional markets
      • Group assignment
      • Filling in the region specifics of the template

Costs all systems have

      • Land costs
      • Permit costs

Picking a battery size

      • Quick overview
      • Moving to the battery size group
      • Filing in specifics for your battery size
      • Interconnection and engineering costs

Picking a battery type

      • Flow or non-flow
      • Moving to the right group
      • Filling in the specifics of the battery type
      • Maintenance costs

If time – understanding your life cycle costs

WORKSHOP INSTRUCTORS

Jason Barmann, Staff Electrical Engineer, Burns & McDonnell

Mr. Barmann is presently assigned to the electrical group of the Energy Division. His responsibilities include utility-scale battery energy storage system (BESS) design, electrical system design, electrical equipment procurement, load flow and short-circuit analysis, protective relay settings and configuration, and preparing electrical schematics for control and protection.


Doug Houseman, Utility Modernization Lead, Burns & McDonnell

Doug Houseman is a long-time industry veteran who is a member of the Gridwise Architecture Council (GWAC), chair of the IEEE Power & Energy Society (PES) Intelligent Grid and Emerging Technology Coordinating Committee, and a NIST Resiliency Fellow. He has been working on storage issues since 1980, when he was involved with several DOD projects.


Chris Ruckman, P.E., Energy Storage Director, Burns & McDonnell

Chris Ruckman is the Energy Storage Director for Burns and McDonnell’s Energy Division where he oversees the development of solutions to meet growing challenges for the electrical grid. An electrical engineer with more than 24 years of experience, Mr. Ruckman combines a passion for sustainable solutions with his deep technical understanding of the utility industry to develop safe, reliable, and cost-effective energy storage solutions. His experience includes electrical system design and analysis, protective relaying, and detailed design for new and retrofit power generation projects, microgrids, and black start.  He is a senior member of the IEEE PES Power System Relaying Committee and currently serves as the Chairman of the Black Start Generator Plant Protection Issues working group. He holds a B.A. in Physics from William Jewell College and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from The University of Kansas.  He is a registered engineer in California, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas and Wisconsin.

Instructors

Doug Houseman, Utility Modernization Lead, Burns & McDonnell

Doug Houseman is a long-time industry veteran who is a member of the Gridwise Architecture Council (GWAC), chair of the IEEE Power & Energy Society (PES) Intelligent Grid and Emerging Technology Coordinating Committee, and a NIST Resiliency Fellow. He has been working on storage issues since 1980, when he was involved with several DOD projects.


Chris Ruckman, P.E., Energy Storage Director, Burns & McDonnell

Chris Ruckman is the Energy Storage Director for Burns and McDonnell’s Energy Division where he oversees the development of solutions to meet growing challenges for the electrical grid. An electrical engineer with more than 24 years of experience, Mr. Ruckman combines a passion for sustainable solutions with his deep technical understanding of the utility industry to develop safe, reliable, and cost-effective energy storage solutions. His experience includes electrical system design and analysis, protective relaying, and detailed design for new and retrofit power generation projects, microgrids, and black start.  He is a senior member of the IEEE PES Power System Relaying Committee and currently serves as the Chairman of the Black Start Generator Plant Protection Issues working group. He holds a B.A. in Physics from William Jewell College and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from The University of Kansas.  He is a registered engineer in California, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas and Wisconsin.


Jason Barmann, Staff Electrical Engineer, Burns & McDonnell

Mr. Barmann is presently assigned to the electrical group of the Energy Division. His responsibilities include utility-scale battery energy storage system (BESS) design, electrical system design, electrical equipment procurement, load flow and short-circuit analysis, protective relay settings and configuration, and preparing electrical schematics for control and protection.


Katlyn Meggers, Utility Planning Specialist, Burns & McDonnell

Katlyn Meggers is a Utility Planning Specialist at Burns & McDonnell, specializing in energy storage technology, power generation benchmarking insights, capital asset planning solutions (CAPS), power plant decommissioning, and due diligence studies. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from the University of Kansas. 

Location

EUCI Office Building Conference Center

4601 DTC Blvd, B-100

Denver CO, 80237

 

Nearby Hotels

Hyatt Regency Denver Tech Center
7800 E Tufts Ave
Denver, CO 80237
Phone: 303-779-1234
0.3 miles away

Hilton Garden Inn Denver Tech Center
7675 E Union Ave
Denver, CO 80237
Phone: 303-770-4200
0.6 miles away

Denver Marriott Tech Center
4900 S Syracuse St
Denver, CO 80237
Phone: 303-779-1100
0.7 miles away

Hyatt Place Denver Tech Center
8300 E. Crescent Parkway
Greenwood Village, CO 80111
Phone: 1-888-492-8847
0.9 miles away

Register

Please Note: Confirmed speakers do not need to register and are encouraged to participate in all sessions of the event. If you are a speaker and have any questions please contact our offices at 1.303.770.8800

Event Standard RateAttendees
Advanced Battery StorageUS $ 1495.00

This event has the following workshops:

Building a Business Case for Your Individual Use CaseUS $ 595.00

This event has the following related events:

Safety in Battery Storage US $ 1195.00

Take advantage of these discounts!

  • Attend the Course and Safety in Battery Storage and 1 workshop and pay US $ 2,795.00 per attendee (save US $ 490.00 each)
  • Attend the Course and workshop and pay US $ 1,895.00 per attendee (save US $ 195.00 each)
  • Attend the Course and Safety in Battery Storage and pay US $ 2,395.00 per attendee (save US $ 295.00 each)

Register 3 Send 4th Free!

Any organization wishing to send multiple attendees to these conferences may send 1 FREE for every 3 delegates registered. Please note that all registrations must be made at the same time to qualify.

Cancellation Policy

Your registration may be transferred to a member of your organization up to 24 hours in advance of the event. Cancellations must be received on or before September 20, 2019 in order to be refunded and will be subject to a US $195.00 processing fee per registrant. No refunds will be made after this date. Cancellations received after this date will create a credit of the tuition (less processing fee) good toward any other EUCI event. This credit will be good for six months from the cancellation date. In the event of non-attendance, all registration fees will be forfeited. In case of conference cancellation, EUCIs liability is limited to refund of the event registration fee only. For more information regarding administrative policies, such as complaints and refunds, please contact our offices at 303-770-8800

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