By - Jon Brown

Aboriginal Energy Challenge
October 26-27, 2016 | Toronto, ON

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Overview

The Aboriginal Energy Challenge is a Forum that provides timely information on the most recent developments in the energy, economic development and legal sectors that are engaging aboriginal participation in energy and economic development projects.

The program will focus on the topics like the First Nations participation in energy projects including the success cases, the economic case for connecting to remote communities, capacity building and jobs creation in the Aboriginal Communities, training and skills development for Aboriginal peoples, project financing opportunities, how to get a deal done with Aboriginal communities and how to get a project through the regulatory process with a minimum of litigation and regulatory risk.

This program is ideally suited towards senior execs from utilities and energy companies, Federal, Provincial and Municipal government officials, Chiefs, band council members and community leaders, consultants, lawyers and policy makers. The event will serve as a valuable communication forum for addressing the many issues that all the parties and stakeholders are trying to come together on.

Conference Highlights:

  • Types of Aboriginal energy projects: past experience, current and future projects in power generation, distribution and transmission
  • Evolution and results of incentives and programs to encourage Indigenous involvement and ownership in the renewable energy sector
  • Regional electricity planning and identifying future opportunities
  • Bringing a project to market – challenges and opportunities of Aboriginal engagement and inclusion
  • Business relationships required to get things going
  • Relationship building: empowerment and energy development, education and capacity building
  • Economic case for investment in high quality infrastructure and financing Aboriginal energy development
  • The rationale for action now – why energy over other priorities?
  • Removing the crutch of fossil-based energy supply
  • Meeting the challenge of delivering sustainable energy solutions in harsh, remote environments
  • DAY 2 Afternoon Workshop – How to Consult and How to be Consulted

…and much more

Learning Outcomes

  • Review types of Aboriginal energy projects
  • Discuss incentives and programs to encourage Indigenous involvement and ownership in the renewable energy sector
  • Review electricity planning and identify future opportunities
  • Assess the challenges and opportunities of Aboriginal engagement and inclusion
  • Build an economic case for investment in high quality infrastructure and financing Aboriginal energy development
  • Identify the challenges of delivering sustainable energy solutions in harsh, remote environments

Credits

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EUCI has been accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).  In obtaining this accreditation, EUCI has demonstrated that it  complies with the ANSI/IACET Standard which is recognized internationally as a standard of good practice. As a result of their Authorized Provider status, EUCI is authorized to offer IACET CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET Standard.

EUCI is authorized by IACET to offer 1.0 CEUs for this conference and 0.4 CEUs for the workshop.

Requirements for Successful Completion of Program

Participants must sign in/out each day and be in attendance for the entirety of the conference to be eligible for continuing education credit.

Instructional Methods

Case studies, PowerPoint presentations, and group discussion will be used at this event.

Agenda

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

8:30 – 9:00 a.m. :: Registration and Continental Breakfast

9:00 – 9:05 a.m. :: Welcoming Remarks from EUCI

Dr. Victor Pogostin, Director of Programs, EUCI Canada

9:05 – 9:15 a.m. :: Co-Chairs’ Opening Remarks

Adam Chamberlain, Partner, Borden Ladner Gervais LLP

Merv McLeod, Partner, McLeod Wood Associates

9:15 – 11:15 a.m. :: Types of Energy Projects: Past Experience, Current Projects and Future Opportunities in Power Generation, Distribution and Transmission
  • From diesel to grid based supply
  • First Nations consultation and engagement
  • Construction, the Challenges, and Success
  • The Future of Five Nations energy Inc.

Pat Chilton, Chief Executive Officer, Five Nations Energy Inc.

  • Forming great partnership with the industry for the development of great renewable energy projects – challenges and success
  • Bringing forth important economic benefits to the First Nation while continuing to foster the preservation of our environment and our further objective of partnering with our non-Algonquin neighbours

Lisa Meness, Funding Research Coordinator, Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation

The evolution of policy instruments to encourage First Nations participation in renewable energy projects and the outcomes.

Paul Norris, President, Ontario Waterpower Association

Identifying future opportunities:

  • Provincial electricity system planning
  • Regional electricity system planning
  • Some examples of current projects and future opportunities uncovered through these planning processes

Stephanie Aldersley, Planner, IESO

  • Establishing First Nation led transmission company to improve transmission service to Pickle lake and connect First Nations to the provincial electricity grid
  • Providing clean, reliable and accessible power for residents, businesses, and industry in the region
  • Economic opportunities for First Nations in the construction and operation of the transmission line
  • Providing a market for First Nation power generation initiatives

Margaret Kenequanash, Executive Director, Shibogama First Nations Council, Chair, Wataynikaneyap Power

11:15 – 11:30 a.m. :: Morning Break

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. :: Incentive Programs and Other Reasons to Do Business in the Area

Susan Waters, Director General/ Directeur général, Lands and Environment Management Branch/ Direction générale de la gestion des terres et de l’environnement, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

  • Evolution and results of IESO’s incentives and programs to encourage Indigenous involvement and ownership in the renewable energy sector:
  • Incentives for Indigenous Communities in LRP and FIT
  • IESO’s Energy Partnerships Program
  • IESO’s Education and Capacity Building Program

Tabatha Bull, Manager, First Nations and Metis Relations, IESO

12:30 – 1:15 p.m. :: Group Luncheon

1:15 – 2:15 p.m. :: Keynote Luncheon Address

Keynote Lunch Speaker will be announced

2:15 – 3:30  p.m. :: Challenges to Be Met

Bringing a Project to Market – Challenges and Opportunities of Aboriginal Engagement and Inclusion:

  • Community engagement, consultation and accommodation and “Free, prior and informed consent (FPIC)”
  • Aboriginal communities as Partners and Nations rather than “stakeholders”
  • Permits, approvals and access to resources and financing – achieving “social license to operate”
  • Aboriginal inclusion, capacity building and entrepreneurship

Stephen Lindley, President, Aboriginal & Northern Affairs, Marketing, Strategy and External Relations, SNC-Lavalin

  • The importance of policy as a catalyst for partnership development.
  • Ontario’s Long Term Energy Plan

David Martin, Special Advisor, Assistant Deputy Minister’s Office, Strategic, Network and Agency Relations, Ministry of Energy

3:15– 3:30 p.m. :: Afternoon Break

3:30 – 5:00 p.m. :: Remote Communities and Energy Development
  • A compelling economic case for investment in high-quality infrastructure – an ethical requirement to ensure that the distant, dispersed and the disadvantaged citizens have a fair shake at improving their quality of life
  • The current state of the energy infrastructure that serves our northern and indigenous population
  • The rationale for action now
  • Why energy over other priorities?
  • Removing the crutch of fossil-based energy supply
  • Commitment to clean energy in our northern and indigenous communities – a powerful impetus to the development of self-standing microgrids and smarter energy systems
  • Setting in motion the technological innovations required to meet the challenge of delivering sustainable energy solutions in harsh, remote environments

Dr. Jatin Nathwani, Professor and Ontario Research Chair in Public Policy and Sustainable Energy, Executive Director WISE, Faculty of Engineering and Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo

On NCC Development’s Northern Energy Project:

  • Energy sovereignty in a diesel environment
  • The economics of microgrids in the North
  • Lessons learned on Northern Projects

Geordi Kakepetum, Chief Executive Officer, NCC Development LP

  • Current status: Diesel-powered electricity generation challenges in Nunavut
  • Solution: Harvesting Inuit lands for clean energy and reducing the dependency on diesel
  • Challenges: Is it realistic to switch to renewable energy in the north?
    • Where have renewables worked in similar conditions?
    • WWF’s pre-feasibility and feasibility studies demonstrate that renewables are not only feasible but also economic
  • Policy environment: What policies can encourage renewable energy investment in the North?

Paul Crowley, Vice President, Arctic WWF-Canada, World Wildlife Fund Arctic Program

  • What is a Community Energy Plan (CEP)?
  • How CEPs enable communities to identify local energy opportunities
  • Create the conditions for implementation in communities

Richard Laszlo, Director, Research & Education, Quest

5:00 p.m. :: Day One Overview by Co-Chairs and Conference Adjourns for the Day


Thursday, October 27, 2016

8:30 – 9:00 a.m. :: Continental Breakfast

9:00 – 9:15 a.m. :: Opening Remarks by Co-Chairs

9:15 – 11:00 a.m. :: Relationship Building: Empowerment and Energy Development, Looking for New Opportunities

Moderator: Harry Hall  Vice President of Supply Chain, Bruce Power 

Isadore Day, Ontario Regional Chief, Wiindawtegowinini

Margaret Froh, President, Métis Nation of Ontario

11:00 – 11:15 a.m. :: Morning Break

11:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. :: Financing Aboriginal Energy Development

Generating long term wealth through power related developments:

  • Running a competitive financing process to raise debt financing for Kwanlin Dün First Nation to invest in a diesel to natural gas conversion project being developed by the Yukon Electricity Corporation
  • Advising the Rainy River First Nation’s Trust on their equity investment in a three significant solar developments totaling 25MW

Paddy Farrant, Executive Director, Deloitte

  • Past experiences in energy project financing from a First Nation perspective
  • First Nation expectations in equity participation in energy projects
  • Potential financing sources moving forward
  • Developing a First Nation Energy Fund

Walter Manitowabi, Managing Partner, Three Fires Solutions, Past Chief Operating Officer, Union of Ontario Indians

  • Finding alternative financing structures as typical structures often will not work
  • Solutions are tending to be private solutions as opposed to governmental at this stage
  • Re solutions, be nimble and flexible

David Sharpe, President & Chief Operating Officer, Bridging Finance Inc.

12:45 p.m. :: Conference Adjourns

Workshop

How to Consult and How to be Consulted

Thursday, October 27, 2016

1:15 – 1:45 p.m. :: Workshop Registration

1:45 – 5:15 p.m. :: Workshop Timing

Overview

Aboriginal Consultation is both a constitutionally protected requirement where government decisions or approvals are required that affect Aboriginal or Treaty Rights and also a “buzz word” that gets used and quoted more and more frequently in the popular media. The critical question for those involved in energy development, however, is what does it mean and what are the implications that it has for energy projects across Canada.  This workshop will attempt to answer that question using real life examples of successful consultation processes along with lessons learned in those processes.  Workshop attendees will be encouraged to raise issues for discussion and to compare experiences, thoughts and approaches to the issues.

Learning Outcomes

  • Review what Aboriginal Consultation means and what are the implications that it has for energy projects across Canada
  • Gain practical advice regarding how to consult and how to be consulted
  • Identify hurdles and risks that can negatively impact accord between communities and industry
  • Discuss what can the Aboriginal and Métis communities, government and industry learn from real life examples of successful consultation processes along with lessons learned in those processes

Agenda

Practical Advice regarding the Duty to Consult – how to consult and how to be consulted
  • Consultation vs. social license
  • Consultation as the “foot in the door”
  • Social license as the sustaining goal of engagement
  • What can we learn from Duty to Consult cases
  • Examples of successful consultation and lessons learned
How to Build Relationships
  • In government
  • The private sector
  • Among Indigenous organizations and remote communities
Aboriginal Consultation in the Context of the Changing Energy Regulatory Framework
  • Managing competing Aboriginal, environment and industry demands
Métis Rights and Consultation
  • Discussion of this quickly evolving area
  • Building accord between Métis communities and industry
What Can We Learn from Each Other:
  • An open and frank discussion summarizing the workshop.
  • Attendees will be encouraged to raise issues for discussion and to compare experiences, thoughts and approaches to the issues.

Workshop Instructors:

Adam Chamberlain, Partner, Borden Ladner Gervais LLP

Adam Chamberlain is National Leader of the Team North, Aboriginal Law and Climate Change Groups and Toronto Regional Leader of the Forestry Law Group. Certified as a Specialist in Environmental Law by the Law Society of Upper Canada, Adam has practiced environmental and energy law for most of his career, focused on infrastructure development. Adam’s practice encompasses diverse matters related to the environmental and other regulatory requirements involved with project development. Adam is also extensively involved in relationships between Aboriginal communities and project proponents related to all manner of developments.

 

Merv McLeod, Partner, McLeod Wood Associates

Merv McLeod considers his job to be that of a cultural translator. Well versed in public policy and government channels, from his formal education and extensive work experience with the Nishnawbe-Aski Nation and the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines, and for the last 15 years, McLeod Wood Associates Inc. Merv has focused his efforts on building the paths that create economic sustainability and opportunities for clients. As complicated as cultural barriers may seem, Merv strives to make the solutions seamless and well understood by all parties included in the process at hand. Merv has built a solid network of contacts. He knows how to find the resources, how to navigate the system and how to make the connections to achieve the desired end result. Merv has found a balance between the First Nations world and the Canadian mainstream with an ease and understanding of what needs to be done and how to make it happen. That makes him a force of positive change.

Speakers

Stephanie Aldersley, Planner, IESO

Tabatha Bull, Manager, First Nations and Metis Relations, IESO

Adam Chamberlain, Partner, Borden Ladner Gervais LLP

Pat Chilton, Chief Executive Officer, Five Nations Energy Inc.

Paul Crowley, Vice President, Arctic WWF-Canada, World Wildlife Fund Arctic Program

Isadore Day, Ontario Regional Chief, Wiindawtegowinini

Paddy Farrant, Executive Director, Deloitte

Margaret Froh, President, Métis Nation of Ontario

Geordi Kakepetum, Chief Executive Officer, NCC Development LP

Margaret Kenequanash, Executive Director, Shibogama First Nations Council, Chair, Wataynikaneyap Power

Richard Laszlo, Director, Research & Education, Quest

Stephen Lindley, President, Aboriginal & Northern Affairs, Marketing, Strategy and External Relations, SNC-Lavalin

Walter Manitowabi, Managing Partner, Three Fires Solutions, Past Chief Operating Officer, Union of Ontario Indians

David Martin, Special Advisor, Assistant Deputy Minister’s Office, Strategic, Network and Agency Relations, Ministry of Energy

Merv McLeod, Partner, McLeod Wood Associates

Lisa Meness, Funding Research Coordinator, Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation

Dr. Jatin Nathwani, Professor and Ontario Research Chair in Public Policy and Sustainable Energy, Executive Director WISE, Faculty of Engineering and Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo

Paul Norris, President, Ontario Waterpower Association

Harry Hall  Vice President of Supply Chain, Bruce Power

David Sharpe, President & Chief Operating Officer, Bridging Finance Inc.

Location

Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel
123 Queen St W
Toronto, ON M5H 2M9

To reserve your room, please call 1-416-361-1000
Please indicate that you are with the EUCI group to receive the group rate.

Room Rate:

The room rate is $CAD 249.00 single or double plus applicable taxes.

Room Block Dates:

A room block has been reserved for the nights of October 25 – 26, 2016.

Rate Available Until:

Make your reservations prior to September 25, 2016. There are a limited number of rooms available at the conference rate. Please make your reservations early.

Register

Event Standard RateAttendees
Proceedings package $ CAD 495.00
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