By - Jon Brown

Smart Cities 2019
August 15-16, 2019 | Denver, CO

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Overview

By 2030, it is estimated that 66% of the world population will live in urban areas, this represents a massive challenge in how we build and manage cities but also provides a significant opportunity to improve the lives of billions of people.  During the Smart Cities 2019 event, organizations and governments will learn how data analytics, new technologies and cyber and physical security systems will improve such things as city transportation, parking, water and waste management, energy usage and a variety of other infrastructure issues that result in the operation of cities and the overall lifestyle of urban citizens.  We will specifically look at such things as:

  • The collaboration of government and utilities
  • How smarter healthcare can help create smarter cities
  • Gathering, aggregating and analyzing data
  • Developing connected intersections and smarter transit
  • Improving public safety through emergency telehealth and navigation
  • Growth in connected vehicle capabilities
  • Greater real-time citizen interaction
  • Linking autonomous vehicles with government sensors and networks
  • Securing smart cities

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss what the next generation smart city will look like
  • Assess the Smart City 3.0 philosophy
  • Define stakeholder communities
  • Discuss how to reach and collect information and data from stakeholders in all communities
  • Determine ways to quantify user needs into measurable functional requirements
  • Define the critical role of the utility and how it intersects with all aspects of everyday life
  • Best practices and lessons learned by community/city leaders
  • Examine the future of advanced modes of transportation, including autonomous vehicles, dockless bikes and scooters
  • Determine how the next-generation of wireless technology will be deployed
  • Define smart urbanization and integrate intelligent transport and infrastructure
  • What constitutional challenges are created by the FCC Orders; how are local utilities affected and how should municipalities respond?
  • Examine “smart parking” initiatives for cities
  • Discuss ways in which utilities and smart cities can collaborate together

Credits

AP_Logo

EUCI has been accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).  In obtaining this accreditation, EUCI has demonstrated that it  complies with the ANSI/IACET Standard which is recognized internationally as a standard of good practice. As a result of their Authorized Provider status, EUCI is authorized to offer IACET CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET Standard.

EUCI is authorized by IACET to offer 1.3 CEUs for this event and 0.3 CEUs for the workshop.

 

Requirements for Successful Completion of Program

Participants must sign in/out each day and be in attendance for the entirety of the conference in order to receive continuing education credits.

Instructional Methods

PowerPoint presentations, case studies and open discussion will be used in this event

Agenda

Thursday, August 15, 2019

12:00 – 12:30 p.m. :: Conference Registration

12:30 – 12:45 p.m. :: Chairperson’s Opening Remarks


12:45 – 1:30 p.m. :: Smart City 3.0: The Next Generation Smart City

While Smart City 1.0 is driven by technology and Smart City 2.0 is government led; in Smart City 3.0 the public becomes the most important stakeholder with the government acting as a facilitator. The most successful Smart Cities in the future will come from developing a better understanding of people’s changing lifestyles; puts people at the beginning of the design process and allows smart technology to support the proposed changes. A well applied Smart City 3.0 effort typically will not only satisfy the three pillars of sustainability: protect the natural environment, enhance human quality of life while maintaining fiscal prudence; but also, be scalable and repeatable. In this session, we will discuss how the next generation of Smart City 3.0 should be applied using a stakeholder-based model in order to drive social change, eliminate objections, minimize design errors while ensuring technology is properly applied to the development of the city. We will look at such things as:

  • What the next generation smart city will look like
  • The Smart City 3.0 philosophy
  • Define stakeholder communities
  • Learn how to reach and collect information and data from stakeholders in all communities
  • Determine ways to quantify user needs into measurable functional requirements
  • Create a test plan and build a project lifecycle plan
  • Maintain compliance with the three pillars of sustainability

Dominic Papa | Executive Director | Institute for Digital Progress

Ryan Trujillo | Innovation & Sustainability Manager | City of Colorado Springs


1:30 – 2:15 p.m. :: Understanding the Role of Utilities in a Smart City

Once we understand the fabric of what makes a city smart, we must then define the critical role of the utility and how it intersects with all aspects of everyday life so we can fully appreciate the responsibility power companies have to smart city initiatives. In this session we will examine:

  • The challenges of grid transformation, from resource planning to ongoing maintenance and support
  • Determining what other technologies utilities should consider in laying out a roadmap for a smarter energy future and smart cities
  • Understanding the responsibility to the community and customer benefits in your decision-making process
  • Creating collaborative partnerships with local/regional governments, telecommunication companies and other organizations
  • Embracing technologies and applications that will disrupt the current environment
  • Grabbing the opportunities smart cities will provide to utilities through such things as electric vehicles, LED/Smart Streetlighting, solar host programs and energy storage, etc.

Carrie Kelly | Smart Services Implementation Manager | Georgia Power Company

Justin Harmond | Operations Manager | Georgia Power Company


2:15 – 3:00 p.m. :: Won’t You Be My Neighbor – Sharing and Collaborating with Other Cities to Bring the Best to Yours

Many governments have rules that state they are unable to work with a vendor if they’ve allowed them to run a pilot program in their city; because of that, many cities are hesitant to be the “guinea pig” while they are in the process of changing these rules as they develop their smart cities projects. One of the best ways for all cities to benefit is to share and collaborate with one another so that not only can Smart City 3.0 be a reality, but so can Smart Country 3.0. This interactive discussion-based session will share best practices and lessons learned by community/city leaders.

Scott Turnbull | Director of Technology | US Ignite

3:00 – 3:15 p.m. :: Afternoon Break


3:15 – 4:15 p.m. :: Smart Mobility of the Future: Advancing Modes of Transportation

  • Examining the future of advanced modes of transportation, including autonomous vehicles, dockless bikes and scooters
  • Determining the role of shared mobility companies in future cities
  • Identifying new high-speed, cheap travel
  • Understanding the need to ease traffic congestion while providing people with the means to get from point A to point B

Jay Kim | Assistant General Manager | Los Angeles Department of Transportation

Dominic Papa | Executive Director | Institute for Digital Progress

Karina Ricks | Director | City of Pittsburgh Department of Mobility and Infrastructure


4:15 – 5:00 p.m. :: 5G: The Next Level of Connectivity for Cities

5G is coming! It promises to be faster, cheaper and better than its predecessors as it unites wireless, wireline and satellite services under a common structure. This session will look at:

  • What cities of the future will look like when buildings, cars, people and other items like devices, appliances, etc. can communicate with each other?
  • How augmented and virtual reality applications can be used in the development of smart cities
  • Determining how the next-generation of wireless technology will be deployed
  • What 5G deployment means for communities and cities of today and tomorrow

Michael Pegues | Chief Information Officer | City of Aurora Illinois


5:00 – 5:30 p.m. ::  Share the Clock, Not Just the Road

Proponents of multi-modal mobility have promoted methods to divide and reallocate the physical space available for mobility, from the use of simple “sharrows” to complex “complete street” arrangements. Mobility, however, is an experience with both spatial and temporal dimensions; in other words, mobility is as much about time as about space. We want to get where we’re going as quickly as we can. Mobility systems allocate time through methods like traffic signal timing and speed limits. Time, however, has not been allocated evenly; rather, most mobility systems allocate time to cars first and everyone else – bikes, pedestrians, scooters, etc. – second. This session will raise awareness of how travel time is allocated disproportionally to cars, investigate why this is so, and explore alternatives that would result in a more equitable allocation of the clock among mobility modes.

Jerry Tinianow | Former Chief Sustainability Officer | City and County of Denver


5:30 – 5:45 p.m. :: Chairperson’s Day One Closing Remarks

5:45 p.m. :: Main Conference Day One Adjourns


Friday,  August 16, 2019

7:30 – 8:00 a.m. :: Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 8:15 a.m. :: Chairperson’s Opening Remarks


8:45 – 9:30 a.m. :: Smart Santa Clara: Improving the Quality of Life and Community Through Technology and Innovation

Learn how one city in Silicon Valley is connecting data, technology and sensors to improve people’s lives. From having situational awareness at an NFL football game to utilizing blockchain technology for carbon credits, Santa Clara will share the opportunities and challenges it’s experienced for becoming a Smart City. 

Gaurav Garg | CIO | City of Santa Clara


9:30 – 10:05 a.m. :: Examples of Digital Inclusion Within Smart City Strategies

The cost of broadband service and a lack of digital skills keeps our most disadvantaged community members from engaging in smart city initiatives. Despite best intentions, digital divides can exacerbate existing equity gaps – economic, civic, health and education. Local government and community leaders are tackling this challenge head on. They will share their strategies, lessons learned and greatest challenges.

Shauna Edson | Digital Inclusion Coordinator | Salt Lake City Public Library

10:05 – 10:20 a.m. :: Morning Break


10:20 – 11:00 a.m. :: New Federal Cell Tower Rules for Municipalities

Smart Cities require significant bandwidth support. Recent FCC Orders, several of which conflict with state laws, have significantly reduced local control to regulate small cell distributed antenna systems and public rights-of-ways that will eventually support 5G deployment. What Constitutional challenges are created by the FCC Orders; how are local utilities affected and how should municipalities respond?  

Devin Mackinder | Director of Technology Services | City of Portage, MI


11:00 – 11:45 a.m. :: Smart Parking: The Changing Face of Parking in Tomorrow’s Smart City

Many cities and communities have been pushing residents and commuters away from using personal vehicles through the increase use of shared rides and other modes of transportation. In many cities and communities, it is feasible to live life without a car, so much so, that parking minimums and mandates are changing in many places. This session will discuss ideas for new uses of individual parking spaces and unveil potential opportunities for existing inventory of parking lots, buildings and garages. We will also examine “smart parking” initiatives for cities that do not or cannot create the infrastructure to eliminate personal cars for their citizens.

Karina Ricks | Director | City of Pittsburgh Department of Mobility and Infrastructure


11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. :: Advancing Clean Air and Climate Change Goals Today Through Sustainable Transport

  • Understanding how emissions from mobile sources affect urban environment and global climate
  • Recognizing public health impact from heavy-duty transit and freight movement
  • Detailing affordable, immediate, and commercially- available opportunities to address positive change
  • Evaluating what cities across globe are doing to make advances today
  • Examining benefits of natural gas vehicles and renewable natural gas (biomethane) fuel as part of the solution

Daniel Gage | President | NGVAmerica

12:30 – 1:30 p.m. :: Group Luncheon


1:30 – 2:15 p.m. :: Smart Sourcing – Get Your Technology Procured!

City leaders continue to create ambitious roadmaps and plans to utilize technology to make cities safer, more livable and more efficient.  Often one of the stumbling blocks is procurement.  Most public procurement was designed for commodities and construction projects and does fit innovation and technology.  But there are ways to effectively, and quickly, evaluate choices and stay within the goals of transparency and fairness in public procurement.  This session will cover

  • Different procurement options for technology- cooperative, piggybacking etc.
  • Outcome driven procurements
  • The shift from capital to operating expense
  • Different processes and methods to speed up or avoid the RFI/RFP process.

Andrew Watkins | President & COO | Marketplace.city

Michael Pegues | Chief Information Officer | City of Aurora Illinois


2:15 – 3:00 p.m. :: The Genesis of a Smart City

As a pioneer municipally-owned fiber community, Lafayette, Louisiana has always led the charge for innovation. Working with the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, the second largest university in Louisiana and among the nation’s leaders in computer science, Lafayette is also a US Ignite city. By leveraging fiber with on-the-job workforce development in the tech industry, Lafayette’s leaders have put in motion Smart City initiatives that engage and connect citizens through innovative public-private partnerships. Cities of any size can learn from this example of smart, efficient resource management and implementation of cross-domain solutions.

Joel Robideaux | Mayor-President | Lafayette Consolidated Government

3:00 – 3:15 p.m. :: Afternoon Break


 

3:15 – 4:00 p.m. :: Building a More Responsive City

Relying on its residents to report issues have caused governments to react slowly or not at all due to under/non-reporting.  The move towards a smart city changes this dynamic between governments and residents as we utilize new sensing technologies to more effectively and equitably deliver services.  In this session, we will discuss the deployment of connected IoT technologies, data sharing and the use of analytics and machine learning.  We will also examine with what and how governments will better understand the performance of its infrastructure and the health and safety of its neighborhoods.

Travis Cutright | Chief Information Officer | City of Mesa


4:00 – 4:45 p.m. :: Improving Real-Time Mobility Information for Efficient Commuting

As autonomous vehicles develop and shared models continue to grow in significance, transport planners are challenged to keep up with that momentum.  They face greater integration of service, information and payment methods, while citizens look for the fastest and cheapest ways to get from place to place.  In this session, we will look at:

  • How can public transit organizations seize opportunities provided by new models?
  • How can mobility experiences be improved?
  • Is it possible to foster innovation and entrepreneurship for greater efficiency?
  • Who takes the lead?

Jay Kim | Assistant General Manager | Los Angeles Department of Transportation


4:45 – 5:00 p.m. :: Chairperson’s Closing Remarks

5:00 p.m. :: Main Conference Adjourns

 

Speakers

Cleve Adams | CEO | Site 1001

KJ Chugh | Head of Smart City Sales | Atos North America

Travis Cutright | Chief Information Officer | City of Mesa

Shauna Edson | Digital Inclusion Coordinator | Salt Lake City Public Library

Daniel Gage | President | NGVAmerica

Gaurav Garg | CIO | City of Santa Clara

Justin Harmond | Operations Manager | Georgia Power

Carrie Kelly | Smart Services Implementation Manager | Georgia Power Company

Jay Kim | Assistant General Manager | Los Angeles Department of Transportation

Devin Mackinder | Director of Technology Services | City of Portage, MI

Dominic Papa | Executive Director | Institute for Digital Progress

Michael Pegues | Chief Information Officer | City of Aurora Illinois

Karina Ricks | Director | City of Pittsburgh Department of Mobility and Infrastructure

Joel Robideaux | Mayor-President | Lafayette Consolidated Government

Angela Siefer | Executive Director | National Digital Inclusion Alliance

Whitney Soenksen | Data Innovation Manager | City of New Orleans

Jerry Tinianow | Former Chief Sustainability Officer | City and County of Denver

Ryan Trujillo | Innovation & Sustainability Manager | City of Colorado Springs

Scott Turnbull | Director of Technology | US Ignite

Andrew Watkins | President & COO | Marketplace.city

Location

Hyatt Regency DTC

7800 East Tufts Ave.

Denver, CO 80237

Reserve your room:

please call 1-303-779-1234

Click here to book online.

Room Block Reserved For:

Nights of August 14 – 15, 2019

Room rate through EUCI:

$159.00 single or double plus applicable taxes
Make your reservations prior to July 24, 2019.

Venue Information

Getting to and from the hotel:

 

Dining options

Register

Event Standard RateAttendees
Proceedings package US $ 395.00
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