Pathways to Utility Energy Storage
June 12-13, 2018
Indianapolis, IN

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Overview

Energy storage has finally emerged as a full-fledge contributor to the energy sector value chain. Simultaneously, the penetration of renewable energy on power systems and grids — especially at the distribution level — is rapidly escalating throughout North America. This, one-two combination has stimulated broad initiatives to find storage solutions that can bring better balance to legacy infrastructure not originally designed to operate optimally with variable and intermittent energy resources.

As utilities and grid operators accommodate added renewables on their grids, storing electrons and releasing them as needed and where needed is a key ingredient to solving those limitations.   Also, evolving technology options and greater consumer awareness to control their energy use are driving economics of storage implementation to catch up with the available benefits. In addition, enough work has been done across a range of jurisdictions to provide better guidance on what regulators need to know and do to create a receptive policy framework for storage solutions to optimize their grid contributions.

This event will bring together a spectrum of vertically integrated and distribution utilities, project developers, regulators, storage technology providers, project developers and system operators to define the realistic opportunities and boundaries of energy storage applications in multiple power environments. 

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss policy and practices of energy storage among federal, state level, transmission and reliability organizations
  • Discuss the current state of energy storage technologies nationwide
  • Evaluate what options are available for energy storage to maximize their capability in the wholesale market
  • Discuss lessons learned and best practices from industry leading procurements by California IOUs
  • Discuss the storage implementation in bulk power systems
  • Evaluate the consequences of the many attributes that energy storage brings to the power system
  • Explain the different methods that electric cooperatives are exploring to develop storage

Credits

AP_Logo

EUCI has been accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).  In obtaining this accreditation, EUCI has demonstrated that it  complies with the ANSI/IACET Standard which is recognized internationally as a standard of good practice. As a result of their Authorized Provider status, EUCI is authorized to offer IACET CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET Standard.

EUCI is authorized by IACET to offer 1.0 CEUs for this conference and 0.7 CEUs for the workshop.

 

Requirements for Successful Completion of Program

Participants must sign in/out each day and be in attendance for the entirety of the conference to be eligible for continuing education credit.

Instructional Methods

This program will include PowerPoint presentations and panel discussions

Agenda

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. :: Registration & Continental Breakfast

8:30 – 8:40 a.m. :: Conference Announcements


8:40 – 9:00 a.m. :: Welcome Address: Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC)

Commissioner Sarah Freeman will discuss the leadership role that the IURC has staked out with regard to the policy and rate formulation measures that facilitate the implementation of energy storage in Indiana.

Hon. Sarah Freeman, Commissioner, Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC)


9:00 – 10:45 a.m. :: Essential Regulatory and Policy Constructs for Energy Storage

For utilities, energy storage can firm up renewable energy resources, reduce the need for peak generation, act as a non-wires alternative to transmission and distribution (T&D) infrastructure investments, increase reliability and resiliency, and provide congestion relief on constrained parts of the grid.  For wholesale markets, energy storage can provide frequency regulation, capacity reserves, voltage support, and energy arbitrage — holding excess electricity for when prices are high.  Despite (or perhaps because of) these multiple applications, jurisdictions have been wrestling with and developing grid-scale energy storage policies for years to capture these benefits and achieve various objectives.  Some are developing policies now, while others have not even begun to consider the storage value equation. This segment will provide an overview of various policy and regulatory approaches and opportunities in key jurisdictions to promote grid-impacting energy storage. 

Jake Schlesinger, Partner, Keyes & Fox LLP

Roger Lueken, Associate, The Brattle Group

Tom Stanton, Principal Researcher – Energy & Environment, National Regulatory Research Institute 

10:00 – 10:15 a.m. :: Morning Break


10:45 – 11:30 a.m. :: Storage Implementation in the Bulk Power System

MISO is enhancing its integration of storage into the wholesale markets with the help of stakeholder insights and input. In this session, Jessica Harrison, Director of Research & Development will cover the following topics:

  • Status of storage in MISO
  • Update on proposed modifications to market products and rules
  • View of where storage is headed

Kevin Vannoy, Director – Market Administration, MISO


11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. :: Utility Procurement of Storage

Utility procurement of traditional resources is a well-defined process. Procurement of energy storage solutions, in contrast, can present unique considerations in utility procurement processes, such as planning and executing an RFO. This session will review storage procurement by California IOUs for both centralized and distributed energy storage solutions, with lessons learned and best practices from their industry leading procurements.

This session is designed for utility representatives who may want to conceptualize and plan their own storage RFOs.

Mihir Desu, Manager, Strategen Consulting, LLC

12:15 – 1:15 p.m. :: Group Luncheon


1:15 – 2:00 p.m. :: Co-op Energy Storage Development

Electric cooperatives have a long history of managing demand through controllable hot water heaters. As prices decline for battery systems, electric cooperatives are exploring various new use-cases, ranging from advanced microgrid developments, renewable energy integration and infrastructure deferral, to community storage solutions for peak demand reduction.  This segment will detail these efforts and the impacts they’re having on the service territories of these coops.

Jan Ahlen, Director, Distributed Energy Resources, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, NRECA


2:00 – 2:45 p.m. :: Realizing the Full Economic Potential of Utility Scale Storage

Profitable application of energy storage for developers and utilities can be achieved right now, but finding the opportunities requires optimizing physical operations of storage to the dynamics of market prices. Storage economics can prove profitable in today’s power markets through creative utilization of batteries to serve as both the physical response to intermittent renewable generation, absorbing congestion manifest as price spikes, furnishing ancillary services, and providing system reliability. Understanding how to realize the value of storage will be addressed through project examples illustrating the economic potential through optimal configurations and system operations to comport with market dynamics and ISO rules. This presentation will present four case studies for unlocking the full value of battery storage by addressing the following:

  • Co-optimized energy and ancillary service operations
  •  Joint capacity, energy, and ancillary operation
  • Flexible storage as a real-time physical hedge for renewable generation
  • Storage for transmission deferral and power system support

Gary Dorris, President, Ascend Analytics

Alison Weiss, Manager – Optimization Analytics, Ascend Analytics

2:45 – 3:00 p.m. :: Afternoon Break


3:00 – 4:00 p.m. :: Panel Discussion: Getting All the Players on the Same Page

The utility industry has moved well beyond pilot projects to the implementation phases of integrative and functioning storage attached to the Grid.  In this interactive panel discussion, panelists with different roles in the energy storage value proposition will share their insights re: the ingredients necessary to enable integrated storage projects, how to get all parties on the same page, and how to adapt these best practices in the utility context.

Hon. Sarah Freeman, Commissioner, Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission

Andrew Ritch , Renewable Energy Strategy and Policy Manager, Duke Energy

Jake Schlesinger, Partner, Keyes & Fox LLP

Kevin Vannoy, Director – Market Administration, MISO

Tom Stanton, Principal Researcher – Energy & Environment, National Regulatory Research Institute

Mihir Desu, Manager, Strategen Consulting


4:00 – 5:30 p.m. :: IPL Advancion Energy Storage Array Tour

This will be a fascinating tour of IPL’s award-winning Energy Storage Array (IPL won the 2017 Project of the Year award from POWERGRID International for this facility). The Advancion battery-based energy storage system is was delivered by AES Energy Storage (now part of Fluence) and is a modular design comprised of eight 2.5 MW cores, each with 30 or more nodes for a total of 244 nodes. More than 20,000 data points in each core are monitored and controlled through software which enables the system to accurately dispatch power from a total of 97,600 lithium-ion batteries.

The IPL Array delivers frequency control services including Primary Frequency Response (to the grid on a 24/7 basis) and Frequency Regulation automatically without the need for dispatch or human intervention. Both services mitigate deviations from the nominal frequency of 60 Hertz. It is the first energy storage system in the U.S. being used to provide Primary Frequency Response. The tour will take approximately 60 minutes and the shuttle will leave from and return to the hotel.


Wednesday, June 13, 2018

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. :: Continental Breakfast


8:30 – 9:15 a.m. :: Battery Storage as an Economic Way to Alleviate Grid Stress

Utility-scale storage is growing at a rapid rate, but it’s still rare for regulated utilities. Most regulated utilities don’t have utility scale storage in their territory now.  Duke Energy, on the other hand, is investing $30 million into the two biggest battery storage projects in North Carolina — a first for the regulated arm of the utility.  The company has seen the promise of battery storage technology yield tangible economic benefits and will discuss how its multiple storage projects have alleviated the stress placed on the grids in which they operate.

Andrew Ritch, Renewable Energy Strategy and Policy Manager, Duke Energy


9:15 – 10:00 a.m. :: Expansion of PSEG’s Microgrid Project and other Storage Offerings

PSE&G has engaged in multiple efforts to evaluate potential storage applications on its distribution system.  In this session, the utility executive leading the effort will discuss how that process got started and what other utilities/stakeholder should know as they look to incorporate storage at the distribution level.  Specifically, this session will discuss how the New Jersey utility:

  • Performed due diligence on potential storage applications
  • Solicited feedback from internal stakeholders
  • Leveraged external support for solution/program development
  • Aligned the program with the goals of regulators

John Dempsey, Manager, Transmission Development, Public Service Electric & Gas Company

10:00 – 10:15 a.m. :: Morning Break


10:15 – 11:00 a.m. :: Residential Storage Projects in South Carolina

Explosive growth in solar generation is driving interest in energy storage which helps utilities meet demand when solar energy production is limited, and Cooperatives are right in the middle of things when it comes to energy storage. Central Electric Power Cooperative (CEPCI) started a residential battery storage project. In this session, Scott Hammond with CEPCI will provide updates on the project, their future plans and how batteries might integrate into the cooperative business model.

Scott Hammond, Program Manager, Central Electric Power Cooperative

Eddie Plowden, Director, Marketing and Energy Services, Berkeley Electric Cooperative


11:00 – 11:45 a.m. :: Distributed Storage: Tool for Utility Opportunities or Customer Defection?

American principles of independence and self-sufficiency, combined with falling prices, makes customer- owned energy storage an attractive option for many. Behind-the-meter energy storage can help customers reduce demand charges, manage time-of-use rates rate, supply back-up power in case of grid outages, decrease reliance on the grid, and allow greater utilization of self-supplied, renewable distributed generation.  This segment will consider whether emerging policies such as interconnection, rate design and the provision of ancillary services that encourage beneficial use of behind-the-meter energy storage will lead to new opportunities for utilities to better serve their customers or result in customer grid defection.

Jake Schlesinger, Partner, Keyes & Fox LLP

11:45 a.m. :: Conference Adjourns

Workshop

Storage: Business Development and Revenue Opportunities Enabled by FERC Order 841

Monday, June 11, 2018

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. :: Registration & Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. :: Workshop Timing

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. :: Group Luncheon

Overview

The U.S. energy storage market has grown significantly since FERC first allowed non-generator resources to provide ancillary services to the grid.  Energy storage resources are now technologically advanced and should be able to participate in markets other than Frequency Regulation.  FERC has agreed and issued an Order that acknowledges the technological advances and recognizes the increased role that energy storage should play in the grid markets.  As such, FERC recently issued rules designed to remove the final barriers for energy storage to provide all market services, including capacity, energy and ancillary services markets operated by RTOs/ISOs.  Many of the states have also recognized the importance of energy storage and have issued regulations that, among other things, mandate procurement targets and are working with grid operators to ensure that behind-the-meter storage can simultaneously participate in the wholesale market. 

This Workshop is designed for energy storage companies and that are interested in learning about what needs to be done to operate successfully on the grid and earn revenues for the services provided. Updates on the states where BTM storage is operating successfully and explain how you can enter the market imminently will be provided.

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss the rules of the new FERC Order 841
  • Explain how the removal of these barriers will increase the proliferation of storage in markets operated by RTOs/ISOs
  • Discuss how states need to look at how they integrate storage on the distribution system
  • Discuss how to forecast compensation in the various markets
  • Explain how states will work with grid operators to ensure that behind-the-meter storage can simultaneously participate in the wholesale market
  • Evaluate states where behind the meter storage is operating successfully

Agenda


FERC Order 841

What Order 841 means for energy storage companies looking to do business in the wholesale markets? This session of the workshop will include:

  • What the rules say
  • Why the rules are necessary
  • What are the next steps storage companies need to do to ensure that it can do business on the nation’s grids
  • Updates on each ISO/RTO and their stakeholder process
    • What’s being contemplated to implement the FERC Order and facilitate its success
    • How to get involved in the process
  • How to anticipate or forecast compensation in each market (e.g., energy, capacity market, ancillary services, etc.)

Behind the Meter Storage

In the past few years, opportunities have increased for storage companies to provide behind-the-meter services (BTM) so the potential for BTM is vast. This session of the workshop will include.

  • Status on what’s happening in the states
  • How can storage be owned and/or operated in each state?
    • Identifying locations with high demand charges
    • Maximizing the grid benefits of behind the meter energy storage
    • Tariffs
    • Procurement contracts
  • Why BTM is economically attractive for the commercial sector
    • Subject to a different billing structure.
  • Participation in wholesale markets
  • Final considerations
  • Future opportunities and next steps

Instructors

Andrew O. Kaplan, Partner, Pierce Atwood LLP

Andrew Kaplan focuses his practice on providers of energy storage, demand response, ancillary services, and electricity and gas transmission and supply, both in the wholesale and retail markets. He regularly represents clients before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Independent System Operators/Regional Transmission Operators (NYISO, ISO-NE, PJM, Midcontinent ISO, California ISO, SPP and ERCOT), and many state public utility commissions. Andrew has won significant rulings before FERC that helped to pave the way for growth among leaders in the energy storage industry.

With more than 25 years of energy law experience, Andrew acts as a strategic advisor to companies seeking private equity, venture capital, and government loans, and provides legal and business guidance to help obtain key U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) loans, state grants, and incentive tax credits/production tax credits for renewable projects. He also helps facilitate the approval process for federal, state, and local permits, assuring compliance with state siting and grid interconnection requirements.

Mr. Kaplan earned his J.D. from the University of Miami School of Law and his B.A. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. His Bar Admissions include Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York


Roger Lueken, Associate, The Brattle Group

Dr. Lueken is an associate at The Brattle Group with expertise in wholesale electricity market design, environmental policy design, asset valuation, and business strategy. He has worked with clients throughout the U.S. and internationally, including market operators, regulated utilities, and market participants. He has a Ph.D. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University, an M.A. in Engineering and Public Policy from the University of Maryland, M.A. and a B.A. in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University


Ray Hohenstein, Market Applications Director, Fluence Energy

Ray Hohenstein is a Market Applications Director at Fluence, a joint venture between Siemens and AES and a leading global provider of energy storage systems and services. In this role, he is responsible for identifying markets and applications that are attractive for energy storage development and educating potential customers on business cases for energy storage. Prior to joining Fluence, he worked for McKinsey & Company, where he served utility and tech clients on a range of topics including digital capability building, mergers and acquisitions, and operations transformations. He holds an M.B.A. from Duke University and a B.A. from Harvard University.


John Fernandes, Senior Consultant  Advanced Technologies, Customized Energy Solutions, Ltd.

John has recently joined Customized Energy Solutions after nearly 5 years in the development, construction, and IPP sectors managing policy and creating new market opportunities across renewable, fossil, transmission, and energy storage business lines.  Prior to his time in the commercial space, John was on staff at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and a regulatory manager for an investor-owned utility.  John has an MBA from the University of Delaware, a Master’s in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University, and is a guest lecturer for the University of Colorado at Denver Global Energy Management Program.


Eric Endress, Senior Electrical Engineer, Performance Compliance, PJM Interconnection

Eric Endress is a Senior Engineer for the Operation Analysis and Compliance department at PJM Interconnection and has worked with PJM Interconnection for 6 years. In his role at PJM, Eric leads various project initiatives including study and research of PJM’s ancillary services, billing and settlement calculations, and statistical data analytics of operations. Over the past 3 years he was heavily involved with PJM’s ancillary service of Regulation. He received his Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Drexel University, specializing in Power Systems.


Mihir Desu, Manager Strategen

 Mr. Desu is a Manager in Strategen’s consulting practice. He is currently involved in corporate strategy work and public proceeding support across the US, covering such topics as rate design, electric vehicle and energy storage policy, project development strategy, and designing new market structures that accurately value and compensate distributed energy resources (DERs). Prior to joining Strategen, Mihir worked for Portland General Electric, an investor-owned electrical utility in Oregon, where he supported DER rate design and policy proceedings and developed models to value qualifying facilities, demand response, and electric vehicles. He has also worked as a consultant for The Cadmus Group evaluating demand-side management programs for utilities and government organizations. He started his career analyzing ISO markets for energy traders and developers with EnergyGPS. Mihir holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Mathematics from Binghamton University.

Speakers

Jan Ahlen, Director, Distributed Energy Resources, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, NRECA

John Dempsey, Manager, Transmission Development, Public Service Electric & Gas Company

Mihir Desu, Manager, Strategen Consulting, LLC

Gary Dorris, President, Ascend Analytics

John Fernandes, Senior Consultant  Advanced Technologies, Customized Energy Solutions, Ltd.

Hon. Sarah Freeman, Commissioner, Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC)

Scott Hammond, Program Manager, Central Electric Power Cooperative

Jessica Harrison, Director – Research and Development, MISO

Ray Hohenstein, Market Applications Director, Fluence Energy

Roger Lueken, Associate, The Brattle Group

Eddie Plowden, Director, Marketing and Energy Services, Berkeley Electric Cooperative

Andrew Ritch , Renewable Energy Strategy and Policy Manager, Duke Energy

Jake Schlesinger, Partner, Keyes & Fox LLP

Tom Stanton, Principal Researcher – Energy & Environment, National Regulatory Research Institute

Kevin Vannoy, Director – Market Administration, MISO

Alison Weiss, Manager – Optimization Analytics, Ascend Analytics

Location

Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
1 S Capitol Ave
Indianapolis, IN 46204

To reserve your room, please call 1-317-632-1234
Please indicate that you are with the EUCI group to receive the group rate.

Click here to book online

Room Rate:

The room rate is $129.00 single or double plus applicable taxes.

Room Block Dates:

A room block has been reserved for the nights of June 10 – 12. 2018.

Rate Available Until:

Make your reservations prior to May 25, 2018. There are a limited number of rooms available at the conference rate. Please make your reservations early.

Register

Event Standard RateAttendees
Proceedings package US $ 395.00