Serving the energy industry for over 30 years
By - Jon Brown

2019 Hawai’i Power Summit
Hawaii Energy Future – changing everything all at once
January 16-17, 2019 | Honolulu, HI

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Overview

Hawaii is making impressive strides toward hitting its target of 100% renewable energy by 2045.  The state, its regulators, utilities and stakeholders are now well down the road towards tackling the commitment to several laudable, though formidable, power system goals:

  • Achieving 100% renewable energy by 2045
  • Attaining 100% carbon-neutral status by 2045
  • Creating a flexible grid capable of accommodating and firming the variation in output of wind and solar
  • Modifying traditional utility compensation structures to reflect a more flexible financial business model that accommodates the grid participation of distributed energy resources
  • Facilitating community renewable energy projects
  • Integrating smart grid technologies, as well as leveraging microgrids, virtual power plants, customer-supplied power and demand response

Persevering through the myriad system and infrastructure planning documents required by the state’s Public Utility Commission (PUC), Hawaiian Electric and other power system stakeholders are forging answers to a 21st century grid in the crucible of the most vexing power environment in the country.  To some it seems an uncomfortably lumpy process.  To others, it’s a marvel of collaboration.

This summit will consist of two workshops and a two-day conference.  The programs will examine several of the innovative planning processes in the Hawaii power system microcosm that are pioneering national — in some cases, global — paths forward on difficult challenges that will eventually confront most U.S., as well as island, utilities and power systems.

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Learning Outcomes

  • Assess the interplay between carbon neutral legislation and attainment of 100% RPS
  • Review the grid modernization landscape in Hawaii
  • Explore the storage laboratory in Hawaii
  • Discuss the Hawaii utility business model landscape with regard to customer expectations and regulatory compliance
  • Assess the contribution of demand response and peak load management towards Hawaii’s transition from fossil fuels
  • Evaluate Hawaii’s march towards democratizing grid contributions and access
  • Discuss system hardening and energy disruption lessons learned from Kilauea and Hurricanes Lane / Olivia
  • Examine the options for converting contaminated lands and brownfields into energy-productive land uses

Credits

AP_Logo

EUCI has been accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).  In obtaining this accreditation, EUCI has demonstrated that it  complies with the ANSI/IACET Standard which is recognized internationally as a standard of good practice. As a result of their Authorized Provider status, EUCI is authorized to offer IACET CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET Standard.

EUCI is authorized by IACET to offer 1.1 CEUs for this conference and 0.8 CEUs for each workshop.

 

Requirements for Successful Completion of Program

Participants must sign in/out each day and be in attendance for the entirety of the conference to be eligible for continuing education credit.

Instructional Methods

This program will use a combination of PowerPoint presentations, case studies and panel discussions.

Agenda

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

7:45 – 8:15 am :: Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:15 – 8:30 am :: Welcome and Overview


8:30 – 9:00 am :: Keynote Address

David Bissell, President & CEO, Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC)


9:00 – 10:00 am :: Interplay between Carbon Neutral Legislation and Attainment of 100%  RPS

  • How the two objectives relate
  • Parsing carbon legislation’s impact on the power sector
  • Carbon offset program framework
  • Progress towards 100% RPS

Lynn McGuire, Partner, ERM

Rick Rocheleau, Executive Director, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) invited

Jeff Mikulina, Executive Director, Blue Planet Foundation

10:00 – 10:20 am :: Morning Break


10:20 am – 12:15 pm :: The Grid Modernization Landscape in Hawaii

  • What needs solving, upgrading?
  • Near-term
  • Long-term
  • Legacy system(s)
  • “Smart” system(s)
  • What kind of a structural and functional blueprint of the proposed modernized grid design that supports stated “grid modernization principles” is possible, and when could it be generated
  • Architecture
  • Platforms
  • Extensibility
  • Status assessment (“walk, “jog”, run”)
  • Pace of adoption
  • CapEx considerations
  • Requirements
  • Sources
  • Distinguishing between maintaining critical legacy infrastructure and adopting new infrastructure/technologies
  • Estimating the percentage participation of the following
  • DER
  • Microgrids
  • Virtual power plants
  • Distribution system
  • Advanced inverters
  • Non-wires alternatives
  • Advanced meters
  • Synchronous condensers

Gary Huffman, Manager – Distribution Services, Burns & McDonnell 

Gregg Lemler, Vice President – Transmission Operations, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

12:15 – 1:15 pm :: Group Luncheon


1:15 – 3:00 pm :: The Storage Laboratory in Hawaii

  • Outlook for contribution of storage
  • Evolution of battery infrastructure and applications
  • Emerging technologies
  • Survey of storage options
  • Short-term, intermediate-term and long-term prospects
  • As a grid-balancing resource in concert with high penetration renewables
  • Technologies available
  • Seasonal dimensions
  • Retrofitting opportunities to installed base of residential solar systems
  • With and without solar
  • Utility-scale
    • Opportunities
    • Potential capacity
    • Drivers
  • Storage proposals in HPUC-approved HECO PSIP
  • Retail and Behind-the-meter
    • Opportunities
    • Potential capacity
    • Drivers
  • Incentives
    • HI state legislation
    • Solar investment tax credit (ITC)

William Capp, President and Founder, Grid Storage Consulting LLC

John G. Jung, President and CEO, Greensmith Energy

Kelly Speakes Backman, CEO, Energy Storage Association (ESA)

Marco Mangelsdorf, President, ProVision Solar

John Pierce, Partner, Perkins Coie

2:45 – 3:00 pm :: Afternoon Break


3:00 – 5:00 pm :: Utility Business Model Response to Customer Expectations and Regulatory Compliance

  • New technologies
  • Ensuring grid reliability from high penetration renewable energy resources
  • Utility-operated power supply vs procured power supply
  • Island-specific solutions
  • Balancing technical advances with consumer rates/bills
  • Correlating implementation with rate cases, de-coupling, DER and other regulatory matters
  • Performance-based regulation
  • How Hawaii has differentiated its approach from other PBR efforts
  • Relationship to DBEDT/London Economics study
  • The leverage sweet spots

DJ Pleskac, Senior Manager – National Strategic Alliances, Burns & McDonnell

Dr. Matthias Fripp, Assistant Professor – Dept of Electrical Engineering, University of Hawaii

Chris Yunker, Energy Systems and Planning Program Manager, Hawaii State Energy Office (DBEDT)

Matthew McDonnell, Commission Counsel, Hawaii Public Utilities Commission

5:00 – 6:00 p.m. :: Networking Reception         


Thursday, January 17, 2019

7:45 – 8:15 am :: Continental Breakfast


8:15 – 8:45 am :: Commissioner’s Address

Hon Jennifer Potter, Commissioner, Hawaii Public Service Commission


8:45 – 10:15 am :: The Contribution of Demand Side and Peak Load Management Towards Hawaii’s Transition from Fossil Fuels

  • Calculating the value proposition of “non-wires alternatives”
  • Hawaiian Electric Co’s customer-centric demand response offerings
  • Coming to grips with distributed energy resource grid participation through DER management system (DERMS) software
  • Energy efficiency measures that contribute to the RPS and carbon neutral 100 pct missions
  • Transportation and other “beneficial electrification” measures and their prospective contributions

Brian Kealoha, Executive Director, Hawaii Energy

Steven Rymsha, Director – Grid Solutions & Public Policy, Sunrun

David Parsons, Chief – Policy and Research, Hawaii Public Utility Commission (invited)

10:15 – 10:30 am :: Morning Break


10:30 am – 12:00 pm :: Hawaii’s March Towards Democratizing Grid Contributions and Access

  • Integrated grid planning (IGP)
  • Smart export and customer grid-supply plus (CGS+)
  • Community based renewable energy
  • Green tariff
  • Competitive procurement
  • Transactive energy and blockchain

Richard Wallsgrove, Assistant Professor of Law and Interim Director of the Energy Justice Program, University of Hawaii Wm S. Richardson School of Law

Isaac Moriwake, Staff Attorney, Earthjustice

Mike Angelo, PhD candidate, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hawaii

Aram Shumavon, Co-founder and CEO, Kevala Analytics

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. :: Group Luncheon


1:00 – 2:45 p.m. :: System Hardening: Energy Disruption Lessons Learned from Kilauea and Hurricanes Lane / Olivia

  • In the face of natural disasters, which parts of the system are most susceptible to damage and compromised performance?
  • Compared to the legacy Hawaii island grid infrastructures of 5 – 10 years ago, what are the strengths and vulnerabilities of renewable energy installations?
  • The power system’s role in supporting refinery operations and impacts
  • Importance of working with the Western Regional Mutual Assistance Group
  • Lessons learned
  • Role of microgrids

Jay Fidell, President and Founder, ThinkTech Hawaii

Theodore (Ted) Peck, President, Holu Energy

Kyle Datta, General Partner, Ulupono Initiative

Tom Travis, Administrator, State of Hawaii Emergency Management Agency

2:45 – 3:00 pm :: Afternoon Break


3:00 – 4:45 pm :: Converting Brownfields, Contaminated and Constrained Lands into Energy-Productive Land Uses

  • What’s available
    • Database/GIS maps
    • Land inventory and prospective sites
    • Incentives
  • What’s not available
  • Potential yield
  • Land use, environmental and cultural practices constraints
  • Suitability for particular development types
  • Available development, financing and environmental resources

Gail Mosey, Project Lead and Senior Research Analyst – Arctic & Remote Communities Land Reuse Options, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Cameron Black, Energy Analyst, Hawaii State Energy Office (DBEDT)

Brandon Hayashi, Hawaii Regional Business Development, Engie Services U.S.

James Duffy, Partner, Nixon Peabody LLP

4:45 p.m. :: Conference Adjourns

Workshops

Pre-Conference Workshop

Post Conference Workshop


Community Solar (CBRE) Collaboration Toolkit for Hawaii

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Overview

As Hawaii’s ground-breaking community-based renewable energy (CBRE) program and tariff are implemented, all parties interested and involved in the delivery of solar projects will benefit from a comprehensive understanding of the essential implementation components, and how to make projects work under the existing framework in the foreseeable time-frame.

This program’s objective is to bring expertise and additional insights to bear from around the other parts of the U.S. where community solar projects have been instituted. It will offer “best practices” as to what has (and hasn’t) worked. Finally, the workshop will further the policy conversation about how CBRE stakeholders in Hawaii can collaborate and continue their refinement of the project development framework, so that it achieves its objectives of extending renewable energy options to a broader swath of utility consumers in an economical fashion.

Learning Outcomes

Attendees will have the opportunity at this workshop to:

  • Assess types of solar garden and community-scale programs and development scenarios
  • Appraise how the Hawaii CBRE program guidelines compare to other shared/community solar gardens, where they differ, and how the most prolific development results can be incentivized
  • Discuss the important marketing components that drive shared/community solar gardens program subscriptions
  • Assess the important regulatory and consumer protections elements of shared/community solar gardens
  • Evaluate common challenges that utilities and their community-scale collaboration partners confront, and how they can be addressed
  • Compare lessons learned from community solar/garden programs around the country for application in Hawaii
  • Identify how NGOs can improve their chances for CBRE development

Agenda

7:30 – 8:00 am :: Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 8:15 am :: Program Overview

I.  COMMUNITY SOLAR PROGRAMS IN THE U.S

8:15 – 9:00 am :: Types of Programs, Respective Characteristics and Development Scenarios

  • Distinctions among types and regulatory mandates
    • Utility-administered
    • Third party- or government-administered
    • Community organization/customer-administered
  • Responsibilities of program sponsor(s)
  • Common elements, requirements and challenges

9:00 – 10:00 am :: Key Program Design Components and Formation Elements

  • Customer offer
  • Initial commitment/payment
  • What is leased and/or owned
  • Impact on consumer bill
  • Billing adjustments over time
  • Duration of contract
  • Incentive(s)
  • Siting and scale
  • Participation usage and capacity limit
  • Environmental attributes
  • Production guarantee
  • Accounting for turnover
  • Subscription transfer and exit policy
  • Subscriber buy-back provision
  • Unsubscribed energy
  • Physics of solar
  • Pricing
  • Virtual net metering

10:00 – 10:15 am :: Morning Break

II.  HAWAII-SPECIFIC PROGRAM DESIGN COMPONENTS AND FORMATION

10:15 am – 12:00 pm :: Hawaii Program Design Components and Formation

  • Phase I — implementation and experience to date
  • Phase II — framework and opportunities
  • Subsequent phases/concept options

12:00 – 1:00 pm :: Group Luncheon


1:00 – 2:15 pm :: Program Aspects That Merit Special Attention

Creation of a program framework

  • Interconnection/queue management process
  • Setting customer credits/compensation
  • Engaging low/moderate income customers
  • IT and technology implementation
  • Payment credits
  • Unintended consequences that the tariff structure of new projects have on already-developed projects

III.     FORMULATING YOUR HAWAII PROJECT(S)

2:15 – 3:15 pm :: Ownership and Financial Structure of Project

  • The community-scale solar investment opportunity
  • Financing elements and metrics
  • Community solar subscription and ownership considerations
    • Are solar subscriptions deemed a security by the SEC and the Hawaii Dept of Taxation?
    • Environmental attributes and their assignment

3:15 – 3:30 pm :: Afternoon Break


3:30 – 5:00 pm :: Structuring Community Solar Projects

  • Forming the team
  • Project and site variables
  • Community engagement
  • Lessons learned in other jurisdictions that may inform ongoing refinement of Hawaii CBRE program and project development

5:00 pm :: Workshop Adjourns

Contributing Content Experts

James Duffy, Partner, Nixon Peabody LLP

James F. Duffy is a partner in the Boston office of the national law firm, Nixon Peabody LLP.  He serves as the Chair of the firm’s Renewable Energy Tax Credit Team and concentrates his practice on structuring and closing transactions involving federal income tax credits and other significant federal and state income tax incentives, including Production Tax Credits for wind and other forms of renewable energy, Energy Investment Tax Credits for solar and certain other forms of renewable energy.  He is a graduate of the University of Rhode Island, B.A., summa cum laude, and The Harvard Law School, J.D.


Eric S. Graber-Lopez, President, Blue Wave Capital

Eric S. Graber-Lopez is co-founder and President of BlueWaveSolar.  He is deeply involved in all aspects of BlueWave Capital’s development activities with a focus on project financing, regulatory affairs, as well as corporate development and strategy.  Prior to starting the company, Mr. Graber-Lopez served as Vice President and Senior Equity Analyst on the Specialty Equity Growth Team at Putnam Investments, where he was part of a team managing $8 billion in U.S. mid- and large-cap growth equity portfolios. He started as a Senior Equity Analyst within Putnam’s Global Equity Research Group and was a member of the Natural Resources and Utilities fund teams. During his years on the sell-side, he focused on the Energy and Utilities industries and was ranked by several leading industry surveys as being among the top analysts in his field. Mr. Graber-Lopez has extensive experience in firm valuation, mergers and acquisitions advisory services, private equity transactions, and portfolio management. He holds an MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management and a BA from Hampshire College.


Melissa Miyashiro, Chief of Staff, Blue Planet

Melissa Miyashiro is Chief of Staff at Blue Planet Foundation.  She oversees the organization’s strategic planning, communications, and organizational development.  Prior to joining Blue Planet, she worked as a legal fellow assisting state agencies in Hawaii with administrative rule-making, invasive species law and policy, and inter-agency coordination.  She has authored papers on climate justice and taught persuasive writing and legislative advocacy at Hawaii’s law school, and also worked as a litigator in private practice and completed a clerkship at the Hawaii Intermediate Court of Appeals. Before attending law school, Ms Miyashiro worked as an environmental scientist for a Hawaii-based consulting company, managing multi-party environmental projects.  She received a law degree and a certificate in Environmental Law from the William S. Richardson School of Law and a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Denver.


Matthew T. McDonnell, Commission Counsel, State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission

Matthew T. McDonnell serves as Commission Counsel at the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission, where he supports numerous efforts, including integrated demand-side management, energy efficiency, community solar, and other DER-related issues. His experience in energy consulting and electric utility regulation has focused on DERs and the development of new utility regulatory and business models.  As a consultant, Mr. McDonnell has advised clients on a variety of energy projects including independent review of generation options analysis, as well as regulatory issues involving the transmission and sale of electricity.  Mr. McDonnell earned his Juris Doctor from the University of Arizona and a B.A. in Finance from Michigan State University.


Ryan McCauley, CEO, Tritium3

Ryan McCauley is CEO at Tritium3, a Honolulu-based boutique firm he founded in 2012 that engages in renewable-energy consulting, development, construction and commissioning services for landowners, large-scale system owners and developers at various project stages. The firm provides professional asset management, and operations and maintenance services for approximately 70MW of commercial and utility solar projects on Oahu, Kauai, Maui and Hawaii Island. Before starting Tritium3, Mr. McCauley served Hoku Solar in roles as vice president of project development and general manager for five years, and at Hoku Scientific as director of production and government contracts manager for five years. He also served six years as a surface warfare officer for the U.S. Navy.


Nate Owen, CEO, Ampion

Nate Owen is Founder and CEO of Ampion, providers of a web-based platform to bring energy retailing systems and back office best practices to renewable energy asset management; the company was recently re-branded from Acadia Micro.  Prior to his involvement at Ampion, Mr. Owen founded and served as CEO of ESG, where he led efforts to establish data and business process standards in New England, New York, PJM, ERCOT, and California. He sold the company in 2013 and pivoted to the renewable energy sector.   He is a co-chair of the NY PSC CDG work group to establish data communication protocols between utilities and shared renewable sponsors.


Richard Wallsgrove, Assistant Professor of Law and Interim Director of the Energy Justice Program, University of Hawaii Wm S. Richardson School of Law

Richard Wallsgrove is a Visiting Assistant Professor working with the Environmental Law Program. Prior to joining the William S. Richardson School of Law, he served as the Policy Director for the Blue Planet Foundation. During his time spearheading the nonprofit’s clean energy advocacy, key successes included:  working to pass the nation’s first 100% renewable portfolio standard; advocating to halt the expansion of the state’s last coal generating station; co-founding the Drive Electric Hawaii partnership; and creating the annual Hawaii Energy Report Card. He has also worked with the Center for Island Climate Adaptation & Policy to analyze climate change adaptation tools for managing water resources in the Pacific. His prior legal practice focused on complex commercial litigation and transactions.  In 2014, he was selected as one of the Pacific Business News “Forty Under 40” business and community leaders.


Planning & Procuring in Parallel: Broadening Hawaii Grid Development Options

Friday, January 18, 2019

Overview

The Hawaiian Electric Cos. have pioneered a new approach to planning and procuring resources that will — 1) create a flexible grid capable of accommodating the variation in output of wind and solar, 2) modernize and integrate smart grid technologies, 3) accommodate proliferating distributed energy resources, and 4) adjust to a vibrantly aspirational legislative and regulatory environment.  This new process, referred to as integrated grid planning (IGP), is a bold step towards the companies’ stated intent in the Dec 2016 PSIP to accelerate the timeline for attainment of 100% renewable energy outcome to 2040.

The IGP paradigm was forged by the five Hawaiian Electric operating utilities after multiple integrated resource (IRP) and power supply improvement plan (PSIP) iterations fell short of PUC expectations.  This planning blueprint pioneers a more holistic process that incorporates distribution planning into the more traditional generation resource and transmission planning process.  The IGP envelopes the resource, grid services, and non-wires alternatives solution sourcing and acquisition into the heart of the planning process.

This workshop will examine the regulatory, policy and planning instruments within the IGP that will propel the state power systems to move quickly and efficiently towards achieving their renewable energy goals.   It will then review the many alternative resources available today and in the future that can be used and integrated into the rapidly evolving “grid of the future” that is both reliable and cost effective.  Finally, the program will discuss how the IGP’s innovative, embedded procurement process will more aggressively drive the islands’ progress toward the interim renewable energy milestones and the ultimate 2045 2040 outcome.

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss Hawaiian Electric’s Integrated Grid Planning (IGP) process and features of the new approach to IRP
  • Assess available carbon-free/renewable generation resources
  • Examine the toolbox of integration options, including storage, demand response and other non-wire alternatives
  • Explore new integration approaches and business models
  • Evaluate the innovative vetting and procurement process

Agenda

7:30 – 8:00 am :: Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 8:15 am :: Program Overview

8:15 – 9:00 am    

Hawaiian Electric’s Integrated Grid Planning (IGP) Process

  • “C3GP” (comprehensive, customer-focused, and cooperative grid planning)
  • Forecasts and planning inputs
  • Resource needs and sourcing
  • Transmission & distribution needs and alternatives
  • Near-term action plan and long-term pathway

9:00 – 10:00 am  

Policy Matters

  • Integrated Grid Plan (IGP) Innovations
    • Non-sequential procurement to improve process (RFIs/RFPs)
    • Technical advisory panel, forecasting and market working groups
  • IGP compared to traditional planning processes
  • IGP compared to other entities with innovative grid planning processes – New York, California, Colorado
  • Compensation payments for distributed resources
  • Data-sharing guidelines and practices
  • Relationship to performance-based regulation (PBR)

10:00 – 10:15 am :: Morning Break

10:15 am – 12:00 pm

Features of the New Approach to IRP IGP

  • VoS methodology
  • Avoiding debates — aligning planning with procuring
  • RFIs and RFPs
  • Competitive procurement
  • Mechanics
  • Balancing realistic outcomes with process transparency
  • Tariffs

12:00 – 1:00 pm :: Group Luncheon

1:00 – 2:15 pm

Assessing Available Carbon-free/Renewable Generation Resources

  • Solar
  • Wind
  • Geothermal
  • Biomass
  • Waste-to-energy
  • Offshore wind
  • Off-Island wind + cable
  • Enhanced/hybrid fossil generation technologies
  • Floating platform offshore wind
  • Hydrokinetic
  • Storage assisted combined cycle
  • Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)
  • LNG with Carbon capture/sequestration (CCS) 

2:15 – 3:15 pm

The Toolbox of integration: Storage, Demand Response and Other Non-wire Alternatives

  • Variable load storage / demand response
  • Electro-chemical batteries
  • Thermal energy storage
  • Mechanical storage
  • Advanced inverters and other emerging technologies
  • Distribution system and DER services
  • Other non-wire alternatives (NWA)

3:15 – 3:30 pm :: Afternoon Break

3:30 – 5:00 pm

 New Integration approaches and business models

  • Micro grids
  • Virtual power plants and other system management methods
  • Community-based solar and renewables

The Vetting and Procurement Process

  • Forecast and other planning inputs
  • Resource needs planning
  • 5-year resource solution sourcing
  • T&D solution sourcing
  • Solution/bid evaluation and 5-year IGP Plan
  • Regulatory approval (as required)

Contributing Content Experts

Bill Capp, Founder, Grid Storage Consulting LLC

Bill Capp is the Founder of Grid Storage Consulting, an advisory firm providing expertise to various stakeholders interested in improving the operation of electrical systems with advanced energy storage.  Clients include utilities interesting in learning about how to integrate storage, firms developing an energy storage strategy and financial entities evaluating potential energy storage investments.  Before founding GSC, Mr. Capp served Beacon Power as President and CEO for 10 years. He led Beacon’s technology development and commercial deployment efforts to align the company’s patented flywheel technology with grid-scale energy storage opportunities.  Beacon is frequently credited for leading the creation of markets for energy storage resources to provide frequency regulation services and subsequently for leading the effort to achieve “pay for performance” (FERC order 755).  Prior to Beacon Power, Mr. Capp had a variety of general management, product development and manufacturing technology roles in Ford Motor Company, Ingersoll-Rand and York International.  He holds seven patents in diverse fields relating to sensors, micro-grids, photovoltaic systems, and grid services. 


Mike Ropp, President & Principal Engineer / Northern Plains Power

Michael Ropp is President and Principal Engineer of Northern Plains Power Technologies.  Dr. Ropp has nearly 20 years of experience in power engineering, power electronics, and photovoltaics.  His experience encompasses computer modeling of power systems; grid integration of distributed energy resources (DERs); design, modeling, fabrication and testing of power electronic converters (DC-DC and DC-AC); modeling, control, and monitoring of energy storage systems; and the design, system integration, control and dynamics, protection, and seamless grid integration of low-inertia systems (microgrids).  Dr. Ropp has worked in nearly every aspect of photovoltaics, from solar cell fabrication through on- and off-grid system design.  He has authored some 50 technical publications and presently holds two patents.  He is a Senior Member of the IEEE and is active in standards creation.


Andy Hoke, Sr. Engineer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Anderson F. Hoke is a Senior Engineer in the Power Systems Engineering Center of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). His research interests include power electronics and controls for integration of distributed and renewable energy with electric power systems. He is experienced in design, testing, modeling, simulation, and hardware-in-the-loop techniques.  Dr. Hoke is active in DER standards development and is currently the Chair of the IEEE P1547.1 Working Group. Before joining NREL, he designed and installed renewable and distributed energy systems, including more than 100 grid-tied and off-grid solar PV systems.  Dr. Hoke has co-authored some 30 publications and received the IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) General Meeting Best Conference Paper Award in 2015 and 2017.  He has been appointed as a member of the Hawaiian Electric Companies’ technical advisory panel.


Isaac Moriwake, Staff Attorney, Earthjustice

Isaac Moriwake is an attorney in the Mid-Pacific Office of Earthjustice, a non-profit, public-interest law firm working on environmental and energy cases across the nation.  He has more than a decade of experience practicing before federal and state courts and agencies and has engaged for over five years in numerous proceedings before the Hawai‘i Public Utility Commission relating to clean energy programs, rules, and policies and utility planning and regulation.  He has served as a member of the Reliability Standards Working Group and the Integrated Resource Planning Advisory Group convened by the PUC.  Mr. Moriwake graduated with honors from Pomona College and University of Hawai‘i Law School, after which he clerked for Justice Paula A. Nakayama of the Hawai‘i Supreme Court.


Aram Shumavon, CEO, Kevala, Inc.

Aram Shumavon is founder and CEO of Kevala, Inc., and prior founder and executive director of the nonprofit Distributed Energy Consumer Advocates. He has more than 15 years of experience in regulated energy markets, with a focus on high penetration distributed and renewable energy resources. Mr. Shumavon has helped develop state and federal policy, managed the development of regulatory strategies, and created innovative market infrastructure and policy analysis tools. His work includes more than a decade as a senior analyst at the California Public Utilities Commission, where he headed the state’s analysis of key wholesale electricity market design and environmental compliance efforts and led long-term procurement and planning efforts focused on California’s high renewables penetration future and renewables integration strategies. Mr. Shumavon has an AB in economics and public policy from the University of Chicago.

Speakers

Mike Angelo, PhD candidate, University of Hawaii

David Bissell, President & CEO, Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC)

Cameron Black, Energy Analyst, Hawaii State Energy Office (DBEDT)

William Capp, President and Founder, Grid Storage Consulting LLC

Kyle Datta, General Partner, Ulupono Initiative

James Duffy, Partner, Nixon Peabody LLP

Jay Fidell, President and Founder, ThinkTech Hawaii

Dr. Matthias Fripp, Assistant Professor – Dept of Electrical Engineering, University of Hawaii

Brandon Hayashi, Hawai’i Regional Business Development Manager, Engie Services U.S.

Gary Huffman, Manager – Distribution Services, Burns & McDonnell

John G. Jung, President and CEO, Greensmith Energy

Brian Kealoha, Executive Director, Hawaii Energy

Gregg Lemler, Vice President – Transmission Operations, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

Marco Mangelsdorf, President, ProVision Solar

Matthew McDonnell, Commission Counsel, Hawaii Public Utilities Commission

Lynn McGuire, Partner, ERM

Jeff Mikulina, Executive Director, Blue Planet Foundation

Isaac Moriwake, Staff Attorney, Earthjustice

Gail Mosey, Project Lead and Senior Research Analyst – Arctic & Remote Communities Land Reuse Options, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

David Parsons, Chief – Policy and Research, Hawaii Public Utility Commission (invited)

Theodore (Ted) Peck, President, Holu Energy

John Pierce, Partner, Perkins Coie

DJ Pleskac, Senior Manager – National Strategic Alliances, Burns & McDonnell

Hon Jennifer Potter, Commissioner, Hawaii Public Service Commission

Steven Rymsha, Director – Grid Solutions & Public Policy, Sunrun

Rick Rocheleau, Executive Director, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) invited

Aram Shumavon, CEO, Kevala, Inc.

Kelly Speakes Backman, CEO, Energy Storage Association (ESA)

Tom Travis, Administrator, State of Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (invited)

Richard Wallsgrove, Assistant Professor of Law and Interim Director of the Energy Justice Program, University of Hawaii Wm S. Richardson School of Law

Chris Yunker, Energy Systems and Planning Program Manager, State Energy Office (DBEDT)

Location

Hilton Waikiki Beach

2500 Kuhio Ave

Honolulu, HI 96815

Reserve your room:

please call 1-808-922-0811

Room Block Reserved For:

Nights of January 14 – 18, 2019

Room rate through EUCI:

$180.00 plus $30.00 resort fee single or double plus applicable taxes
Make your reservations prior to December 14, 2018.

Register

Please Note: Confirmed speakers do not need to register and are encouraged to participate in all sessions of the event. If you are a speaker and have any questions please contact our offices at 1.303.770.8800

EventEarly Bird Before
Friday, January 04, 2019
Standard RateAttendees
2019 Hawai'i Power SummitUS $ 1295.00US $ 1495.00

This event has the following workshops:

Community Solar (CBRE) Collaboration Toolkit for HawaiiUS $ 895.00
US $ 995.00
Planning & Procuring in Parallel: Broadening Hawaii Grid Development OptionsUS $ 895.00
US $ 995.00

*Please note: all attendees of the conference will receive a link to downlaod all presentations that are made available by the presenters. If you cannot attend the conference but would still like a copy of these materials, please consider purchasing the proceedings package listed below

I cannot attend but would like a copy of the proceedings

Proceedings packageUS $ 495.00

Take advantage of these discounts!

  • Attend the Conference and both workshops and pay US $ 2,895.00 per attendee (save US $ 190.00 each)
  • Attend the Conference and any 1 workshop and save US $ 95.00 per attendee

Register 3 Send 4th Free!

Any organization wishing to send multiple attendees to these conferences may send 1 FREE for every 3 delegates registered. Please note that all registrations must be made at the same time to qualify.

Cancellation Policy

Your registration may be transferred to a member of your organization up to 24 hours in advance of the event. Cancellations must be received on or before December 14, 2019 in order to be refunded and will be subject to a US $195.00 processing fee per registrant. No refunds will be made after this date. Cancellations received after this date will create a credit of the tuition (less processing fee) good toward any other EUCI event. This credit will be good for six months from the cancellation date. In the event of non-attendance, all registration fees will be forfeited. In case of conference cancellation, EUCIs liability is limited to refund of the event registration fee only. For more information regarding administrative policies, such as complaints and refunds, please contact our offices at 303-770-8800

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